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Volume 36(5); October 2021
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Review Articles
Calcium & Bone Metabolism
Review and Update of the Risk Factors and Prevention of Antiresorptive-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw
Ha Young Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):917-927.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1170
  • 4,921 View
  • 284 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Antiresorptive-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (ARONJ) is a rare but serious adverse event of bisphosphonate or denosumab administration; it is associated with severe pain and a deteriorated quality of life. Since its first report in 2003, there have been many studies on its definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Nevertheless, the epidemiology and mechanisms underlying this condition have not yet been fully delineated and several risk factors are known. Moreover, as there is no effective treatment currently available for osteonecrosis of the jaw, prevention is essential. Furthermore, close cooperation between prescribing physicians and dentists is important. The aim of this review was to provide up-to-date information regarding the risk factors and prevention of ARONJ from a physician’s perspective.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Risk factors for dental findings of the development of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: Investigation of 3734 teeth in cancer patients receiving high dose antiresorptive agents
    Mitsunobu Otsuru, Yoshinari Fujiki, Sakiko Soutome, Norio Nakamura, Taro Miyoshi, Tomofumi Naruse, Mizuho Ohnuma, Yuka Hotokezaka, Satoshi Rokutanda, Masahiro Umeda
    Journal of Dental Sciences.2024; 19(1): 203.     CrossRef
  • Editorial: Immunological processes in maxillofacial bone pathology
    Matthias Tröltzsch
    Frontiers in Immunology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Polysacharide of Agaricus blazei gel mitigates bone necrosis in model of the jaws related to bisphosphonate via Wnt signaling
    Vanessa Costa de Sousa, Fátima Regina Nunes Sousa, Raquel Felipe Vasconcelos, Gisele Angelino Barreto, Conceição S. Martins, Nilson Romero Dias, Sislana Costa, Maria Jennifer Chaves Bernardino, George de Almeida Silva, Nadine Linhares, Delane Gondim, Mirn
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevention of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw after tooth extraction by local administration of antibiotics and atelocollagen sponge: A preliminary study
    Natsumi Nakamura, Sakiko Soutome, Akira Imakiire, Satoshi Rokutanda, Seigo Ohba, Shunsuke Sawada, Yuka Kojima, Yuki Sakamoto, Yoshiko Yamamura, Madoka Funahara, Mitsunobu Otsuru, Masahiro Umeda
    Journal of Dental Sciences.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • When and how to stop denosumab therapy in a patient with osteoporosis
    Eirena L. Goulden, Rachel K. Crowley
    Clinical Endocrinology.2023; 98(5): 649.     CrossRef
  • Clinical and Histopathological Aspects of MRONJ in Cancer Patients
    George Adrian Ciobanu, Laurențiu Mogoantă, Adrian Camen, Mihaela Ionescu, Daniel Vlad, Ionela Elisabeta Staicu, Cristina Maria Munteanu, Mircea Ionuț Gheorghiță, Răzvan Mercuț, Elena Claudia Sin, Sanda Mihaela Popescu
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(10): 3383.     CrossRef
  • Bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaws: Clinical and forensic aspects
    Diana Nogueira, Inês Morais Caldas, Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveira
    Archives of Oral Biology.2023; 155: 105792.     CrossRef
  • Correlations between Immune Response and Etiopathogenic Factors of Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw in Cancer Patients Treated with Zoledronic Acid
    George Adrian Ciobanu, Laurențiu Mogoantă, Sanda Mihaela Popescu, Mihaela Ionescu, Cristina Maria Munteanu, Ionela Elisabeta Staicu, Răzvan Mercuț, Cristian Corneliu Georgescu, Monica Scrieciu, Daniel Vlad, Adrian Camen
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(18): 14345.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of the Degree of Information of Dental Surgeons about Antiresorptive Drugs According to the Time Since Graduation in Dentistry
    Flávia Godinho Costa Wanderley Rocha, Roberto Paulo Correia de Araújo
    Pesquisa Brasileira em Odontopediatria e Clínica Integrada.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Safety and Efficacy of Pamidronate in Neonatal Hypercalcemia Caused by Subcutaneous Fat Necrosis: A Case Report
    Stefano Martinelli, Marco Pitea, Italo Francesco Gatelli, Tara Raouf, Graziano Barera, Ottavio Vitelli
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Zoledronic acid for osteoporosis and associated low-energy fractures
    S. S. Rodionova, A. F. Kolondaev, A. N. Torgashin, I. A. Solomyannik
    Meditsinskiy sovet = Medical Council.2022; (21): 163.     CrossRef
Close layer
Calcium & Bone Metabolism
Applications of Machine Learning in Bone and Mineral Research
Sung Hye Kong, Chan Soo Shin
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):928-937.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1111
  • 5,133 View
  • 186 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
In this unprecedented era of the overwhelming volume of medical data, machine learning can be a promising tool that may shed light on an individualized approach and a better understanding of the disease in the field of osteoporosis research, similar to that in other research fields. This review aimed to provide an overview of the latest studies using machine learning to address issues, mainly focusing on osteoporosis and fractures. Machine learning models for diagnosing and classifying osteoporosis and detecting fractures from images have shown promising performance. Fracture risk prediction is another promising field of research, and studies are being conducted using various data sources. However, these approaches may be biased due to the nature of the techniques or the quality of the data. Therefore, more studies based on the proposed guidelines are needed to improve the technical feasibility and generalizability of artificial intelligence algorithms.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predicting postoperative outcomes in lumbar spinal fusion: development of a machine learning model
    Lukas Schönnagel, Thomas Caffard, Tu-Lan Vu-Han, Jiaqi Zhu, Isaac Nathoo, Kyle Finos, Gaston Camino-Willhuber, Soji Tani, Ali. E. Guven, Henryk Haffer, Maximilian Muellner, Artine Arzani, Erika Chiapparelli, Krizia Amoroso, Jennifer Shue, Roland Duculan,
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  • A CT-based Deep Learning Model for Predicting Subsequent Fracture Risk in Patients with Hip Fracture
    Yisak Kim, Young-Gon Kim, Jung-Wee Park, Byung Woo Kim, Youmin Shin, Sung Hye Kong, Jung Hee Kim, Young-Kyun Lee, Sang Wan Kim, Chan Soo Shin
    Radiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Saleh Alyahyan
    Multimedia Tools and Applications.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ernest Kostenko, Jakov Šengaut, Algirdas Maknickas
    Applied Sciences.2024; 14(11): 4867.     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of common data model-based fracture prediction model using machine learning algorithm
    Sung Hye Kong, Sihyeon Kim, Yisak Kim, Jung Hee Kim, Kwangsoo Kim, Chan Soo Shin
    Osteoporosis International.2023; 34(8): 1437.     CrossRef
  • Machine learning algorithms for predicting the risk of fracture in patients with diabetes in China
    Sijia Chu, Aijun Jiang, Lyuzhou Chen, Xi Zhang, Xiurong Shen, Wan Zhou, Shandong Ye, Chao Chen, Shilu Zhang, Li Zhang, Yang Chen, Ya Miao, Wei Wang
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  • Leveraging Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Regenerative Orthopedics: A Paradigm Shift in Patient Care
    Madhan Jeyaraman, Harish V K Ratna, Naveen Jeyaraman, Aakaash Venkatesan, Swaminathan Ramasubramanian , Sankalp Yadav
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Information of Vertebral Bone and Muscle from Computed Tomography Imaging Improves the Prediction Power of Vertebral Fractures Using Deep-Learning Algorithm (Preprint)
    Sung Hye Kong, Wonwoo Cho, Sung Bae Park, Jaegul Choo, Jung Hee Kim, Sang Wan Kim, Chan Soo Shin
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Quality use of artificial intelligence in medical imaging: What do radiologists need to know?
    Stacy K Goergen, Helen ML Frazer, Sandeep Reddy
    Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology.2022; 66(2): 225.     CrossRef
Close layer
Thyroid
T4+T3 Combination Therapy: An Unsolved Problem of Increasing Magnitude and Complexity
Wilmar M. Wiersinga
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):938-951.   Published online September 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.501
  • 10,178 View
  • 355 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Thyroxine (T4)+triiodothyronine (T3) combination therapy can be considered in case of persistent symptoms despite normal serum thyroid stimulating hormone in levothyroxine (LT4)-treated hypothyroid patients. Combination therapy has gained popularity in the last two decades, especially in countries with a relatively high gross domestic product. The prevalence of persistent symptoms has also increased; most frequent are complaints about energy levels and fatigue (80% to 90%), weight management (70% to 75%), memory (60% to 80%), and mood (40% to 50%). Pathophysiological explanations for persistent problems are unrealistic patient expectations, comorbidities, somatic symptoms, related disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [DSM-5]), autoimmune neuroinflammation, and low tissue T3. There is fair circumstantial evidence for the latter cause (tissue and specifically brain T3 content is normalized by T4+T3, not by T4 alone), but the other causes are viewed as more relevant in current practice. This might be related to the ‘hype’ that has emerged surrounding T4+T3 therapy. Although more and better-designed trials are needed to validate the efficacy of T4+T3 combination, the management of persistent symptoms should also be directed towards alternative causes. Improving the doctor-patient relationship and including more and better information is crucial. For example, dissatisfaction with the outcomes of T4 treatment for subclinical hypothyroidism can be anticipated as recent trials have demonstrated that LT4 is hardly effective in improving symptoms associated with subclinical hypothyroidism.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of DIO2 and MCT10 Polymorphisms With Persistent Symptoms in LT4-Treated Patients in the UK Biobank
    Christian Zinck Jensen, Jonas Lynggaard Isaksen, Gustav Ahlberg, Morten Salling Olesen, Birte Nygaard, Christina Ellervik, Jørgen Kim Kanters
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024; 109(2): e613.     CrossRef
  • Quality of life, daily functioning, and symptoms in hypothyroid patients on thyroid replacement therapy: A Dutch survey
    Ellen Molewijk, Eric Fliers, Koen Dreijerink, Ad van Dooren, Rob Heerdink
    Journal of Clinical & Translational Endocrinology.2024; 35: 100330.     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular mechanisms of thyroid hormones and heart failure: Current knowledge and perspectives
    Viktor Čulić
    World Journal of Cardiology.2024; 16(5): 226.     CrossRef
  • Use of thyroid hormones in hypothyroid and euthyroid patients: A survey of members of the Endocrine Society of Australia
    Nicole Lafontaine, Suzanne J. Brown, Petros Perros, Enrico Papini, Endre V. Nagy, Roberto Attanasio, Laszlo Hegedüs, John P. Walsh
    Clinical Endocrinology.2024; 100(5): 477.     CrossRef
  • Use of Thyroid Hormones in Hypothyroid and Euthyroid Patients: A THESIS questionnaire survey of members of the Irish Endocrine Society
    Mohamad Mustafa, Elsheikh Ali, Anne McGowan, Laura McCabe, Laszlo Hegedüs, Roberto Attanasio, Endre V. Nagy, Enrico Papini, Petros Perros, Carla Moran
    Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -).2023; 192(5): 2179.     CrossRef
  • Levothyroxine: Conventional and Novel Drug Delivery Formulations
    Hanqing Liu, Wei Li, Wen Zhang, Shengrong Sun, Chuang Chen
    Endocrine Reviews.2023; 44(3): 393.     CrossRef
  • Re: “Exploring the Genetic Link Between Thyroid Dysfunction and Common Psychiatric Disorders: A Specific Hormonal or a General Autoimmune Comorbidity” by Soheili-Nezhad et al.
    Christiaan F. Mooij, A.S. Paul van Trotsenburg
    Thyroid®.2023; 33(8): 999.     CrossRef
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    Iva Turić, Ivan Velat, Željko Bušić, Viktor Čulić
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Melike Gulec, Melek Tassoker, Mediha Erturk
    BMC Oral Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Thyroid.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Close layer
Thyroid
Deiodinases and the Three Types of Thyroid Hormone Deiodination Reactions
Laura Sabatino, Cristina Vassalle, Cristina Del Seppia, Giorgio Iervasi
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):952-964.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1198
  • 8,001 View
  • 295 Download
  • 42 Web of Science
  • 53 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling is strictly regulated by iodothyronine deiodinase activity, which both preserves the circulating levels of the biologically active triiodothyronine (T3) and regulates TH homeostasis at the local level, in a cell- and time-dependent manner. Three deiodinases have been identified—namely iodothyronine deiodinase 1 (DIO1), DIO2, and DIO3—that differ in their catalytic properties and tissue distribution. The deiodinases represent a dynamic system that changes in the different stages of life according to their functions and roles in various cell types and tissues. Deiodinase activity at the tissue level permits cell-targeted fine regulation of TH homeostasis, mediating the activation (DIO1 and DIO2) and inactivation (DIO3) of THs. Deiodinase homeostasis is the driving force that leads T3-target cells towards customized TH signaling, which takes into account both the hormonal circulating levels and the tissue-specific response. This review analyzes the complex role of deiodinases in physiological and pathological contexts, exploring new challenges and opportunities deriving from a deeper knowledge of the dynamics underlying their roles and functions.

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Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Hermann A.M. Mucke
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    Federica Gagliardi, Enke Baldini, Eleonora Lori, Silvia Cardarelli, Daniele Pironi, Augusto Lauro, Domenico Tripodi, Piergaspare Palumbo, Eleonora D’Armiento, Giuseppe Cavallaro, Andrea Polistena, Valerio D’Orazi, Simone Sibio, Poupak Fallahi, Alessandro
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  • Bisphenol A-Induced Endocrine Dysfunction and its Associated Metabolic Disorders
    Meenu Maniradhan, Latchoumycandane Calivarathan
    Endocrine, Metabolic & Immune Disorders - Drug Targets.2023; 23(4): 515.     CrossRef
  • Dose- and Time-Dependent Effects of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Field on Adipose Tissue: Implications of Thermoregulation and Mitochondrial Signaling
    Jennifer Maalouf, Amandine Pelletier, Aurélie Corona, Jérôme Gay-Quéheillard, Véronique Bach, René de Seze, Brahim Selmaoui
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(13): 10628.     CrossRef
  • Critically ill patients: Histopathological evidence of thyroid dysfunction
    Dipti Saha, Saurabh Chattopadhyay, Sayak Sovan Dutta, Anup Kumar Roy
    Journal of Critical Care.2023; 78: 154384.     CrossRef
  • Primary Hypothyroidism and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Tale of Two
    Faisal Holil AlAnazi, Hayder M. Al-kuraishy, Athanasios Alexiou, Marios Papadakis, Mohamed H. Mazhar Ashour, Saud A. Alnaaim, Omnya Elhussieny, Hebatallah M. Saad, Gaber El-Saber Batiha
    Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology.2023; 43(7): 3405.     CrossRef
  • Genetically predicted thyroid function and risk of colorectal cancer: a bidirectional Mendelian randomization study
    Qiang Du, Zhaoyang Zheng, Yong Wang, Lie Yang, Zongguang Zhou
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology.2023; 149(15): 14015.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 infection and thyroid dysfunction in children
    K. V. Kozak, H. A. Pavlyshyn, I. Y. Avramenko, O. M. Dyvonyak, O. O. Shevchuk, K. T. Hlushko
    The Ukrainian Biochemical Journal.2023; 95(3): 12.     CrossRef
  • Nongenomic roles of thyroid hormones and their derivatives in adult brain: are these compounds putative neurotransmitters?
    Joseph V. Martin, Pradip K. Sarkar
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hermann A.M. Mucke
    ASSAY and Drug Development Technologies.2023; 21(6): 288.     CrossRef
  • Deiodinase Types 1 and 3 and Proinflammatory Cytokine Values May Discriminate Depressive Disorder Patients from Healthy Controls
    Elżbieta Małujło-Balcerska, Tadeusz Pietras
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  • Thyroid Dysfunction Induced by Fungicide Famoxadone Exposure Contributes to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Male Mice: In Vivo, In Vitro, and In Silico Studies
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    Alaa Hashim MOHMMED, Ban HOSHI, Suzanne JUBAIR
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    Pamela Toh, Jessica L. Nicholson, Alyssa M. Vetter, Marla J. Berry, Daniel J. Torres
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Adrenal Gland
Adrenal Venous Sampling for Subtype Diagnosis of Primary Hyperaldosteronism
Mitsuhide Naruse, Akiyo Tanabe, Koichi Yamamoto, Hiromi Rakugi, Mitsuhiro Kometani, Takashi Yoneda, Hiroki Kobayashi, Masanori Abe, Youichi Ohno, Nobuya Inagaki, Shoichiro Izawa, Masakatsu Sone
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):965-973.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1192
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) is the key procedure for lateralization of primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) before surgery. Identification of the adrenal veins using computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative cortisol assay facilitates the success of catheterization. Although administration of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) has benefits such as improving the success rate, some unilateral cases could be falsely diagnosed as bilateral. Selectivity index of 5 with ACTH stimulation to assess the selectivity of catheterization and lateralization index (LI) >4 with ACTH stimulation for unilateral diagnosis is used in many centers. Co-secretion of cortisol from the tumor potentially affects the lateralization by the LI. Patients aged <35 years with hypokalemia, marked aldosterone excess, and unilateral adrenal nodule on CT have a higher probability of unilateral disease. Patients with normokalemia, mild aldosterone excess, and no adrenal tumor on CT have a higher probability of bilateral disease. Although no methods have 100% specificity for subtype diagnosis that would allow bypassing AVS, prediction of the subtype should be considered when recommending AVS to patients. Methodological standardization and strict indication improve diagnostic quality of AVS. Development of non-invasive imaging and biochemical markers will drive a paradigm shift in the clinical practice of PA.

Citations

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  • A controlled trial of percutaneous adrenal arterial embolization for hypertension in patients with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism
    Yaqiong Zhou, Xinquan Wang, Jixin Hou, Jindong Wan, Yi Yang, Sen Liu, Tao Luo, Qiting Liu, Qiang Xue, Peijian Wang
    Hypertension Research.2024; 47(2): 311.     CrossRef
  • Correlation of Histopathologic Subtypes of Primary Aldosteronism with Clinical Phenotypes and Postsurgical Outcomes
    Chang Ho Ahn, You-Bin Lee, Jae Hyeon Kim, Young Lyun Oh, Jung Hee Kim, Kyeong Cheon Jung
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024; 109(8): e1582.     CrossRef
  • Screening and diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. Consensus document of all the Spanish Societies involved in the management of primary aldosteronism
    Marta Araujo-Castro, Jorge Gabriel Ruiz-Sánchez, Paola Parra Ramírez, Patricia Martín Rojas-Marcos, Almudena Aguilera-Saborido, Jorge Francisco Gómez Cerezo, Nieves López Lazareno, María Eugenia Torregrosa Quesada, Jorge Gorrin Ramos, Josep Oriola, Esteba
    Endocrine.2024; 85(1): 99.     CrossRef
  • Temporal trends in clinical features of patients with primary aldosteronism over 20 years
    Seung Shin Park, Chang Ho Ahn, Sang Wan Kim, Jung-Min Koh, Seung Hun Lee, Jung Hee Kim
    Hypertension Research.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic accuracy of using multiple cytokines to predict aldosterone-producing adenoma
    Fei Qin, Hong Wen, Xiaoge Zhong, Yajin Pan, Xiaomei Lai, Tingting Yang, Jing Huang, Jie Yu, Jianling Li
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    Jeonghoon Ha, Jung Hwan Park, Kyoung Jin Kim, Jung Hee Kim, Kyong Yeun Jung, Jeongmin Lee, Jong Han Choi, Seung Hun Lee, Namki Hong, Jung Soo Lim, Byung Kwan Park, Jung-Han Kim, Kyeong Cheon Jung, Jooyoung Cho, Mi-kyung Kim, Choon Hee Chung
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    Mara Carsote
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Editorial
Thyroid
Comparison of Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems in Malignancy Risk Stratification of Indeterminate Thyroid Nodules
Bo Hyun Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):974-976.   Published online October 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1287
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  • 104 Download
PDFPubReader   ePub   
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Original Articles
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
The Effects of Glucose Lowering Agents on the Secondary Prevention of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Inha Jung, Hyemi Kwon, Se Eun Park, Kyung-Do Han, Yong-Gyu Park, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):977-987.   Published online October 14, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1046
  • 4,327 View
  • 179 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Patients with diabetes have a higher risk of requiring repeated percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) than non-diabetic patients. We aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of anti-diabetic drugs on the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.
Methods
We analyzed the general health check-up dataset and claims data of the Korean National Health Insurance Service of 199,714 participants (age ≥30 years) who underwent PCIs between 2010 and 2013. Those who underwent additional PCI within 1 year of their first PCI (n=3,325) and those who died within 1 year (n=1,312) were excluded. Patients were classified according to their prescription records for glucose-lowering agents. The primary endpoint was the incidence rate of coronary revascularization.
Results
A total of 35,348 patients were included in the study. Metformin significantly decreased the risk of requiring repeat PCI in all patients (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.77). In obese patients with body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2, patients treated with thiazolidinedione (TZD) exhibited a decreased risk of requiring repeat revascularization than those who were not treated with TZD (aHR, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.95). Patients treated with metformin showed a decreased risk of requiring revascularization regardless of their BMI. Insulin, meglitinide, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitor were associated with increased risk of repeated PCI.
Conclusion
The risk of requiring repeat revascularization was lower in diabetic patients treated with metformin and in obese patients treated with TZD. These results suggest that physicians should choose appropriate glucose-lowering agents for the secondary prevention of coronary artery disease.

Citations

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  • Preadmission metformin use increased the incidence of hyperlactatemia at admission and 30-day in-hospital mortality among T2D patients with heart disease at high risk of hypoxia
    Le Zhang, Xia Zhao, Zhongsu Wang, Hao Deng, Xue Zhang, Xuan Wang, Jiahui Lao, Mei Gao, Yinglong Hou, Yi Han
    International Journal of Cardiology.2024; 412: 132338.     CrossRef
  • Application of systemic inflammation indices and lipid metabolism-related factors in coronary artery disease
    Zhuoyan Zhao, Huan Lian, Yixiang Liu, Lixian Sun, Ying Zhang
    Coronary Artery Disease.2023; 34(5): 306.     CrossRef
  • Effect of metformin on adverse outcomes in T2DM patients: Systemic review and meta-analysis of observational studies
    Zhicheng Xu, Haidong Zhang, Chenghui Wu, Yuxiang Zheng, Jingzhou Jiang
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Establishment of a Predictive Model for Poor Prognosis of Incomplete Revascularization in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease and Multivessel Disease
    Huan Lian, Zhuoyan Zhao, Kelin Ma, Zhenjiang Ding, Lixian Sun, Ying Zhang
    Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis.2022; 28: 107602962211392.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
How Can We Adopt the Glucose Tolerance Test to Facilitate Predicting Pregnancy Outcome in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus?
Kyeong Jin Kim, Nam Hoon Kim, Jimi Choi, Sin Gon Kim, Kyung Ju Lee
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):988-996.   Published online October 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1107
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
We investigated how 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results can be used to predict adverse pregnancy outcomes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) patients.
Methods
We analyzed 1,059 pregnant women who completed the 100-g OGTT between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. We compared the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes according to OGTT patterns by latent profile analysis (LPA), numbers to meet the OGTT criteria, and area under the curve (AUC) of the OGTT graph. Adverse pregnancy outcomes were defined as a composite of preterm birth, macrosomia, large for gestational age, low APGAR score at 1 minute, and pregnancy-induced hypertension.
Results
Overall, 257 participants were diagnosed with GDM, with a median age of 34 years. An LPA led to three different clusters of OGTT patterns; however, there were no significant associations between the clusters and adverse pregnancy outcomes after adjusting for confounders. Notwithstanding, the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome increased with an increase in number to meet the OGTT criteria (P for trend=0.011); odds ratios in a full adjustment model were 1.27 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 2.23), 2.16 (95% CI, 1.21 to 3.85), and 2.32 (95% CI, 0.66 to 8.15) in those meeting the 2, 3, and 4 criteria, respectively. The AUCs of the OGTT curves also distinguished the patients at risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes; the larger the AUC, the higher the risk (P for trend=0.007).
Conclusion
The total number of abnormal values and calculated AUCs for the 100-g OGTT may facilitate tailored management of patients with GDM by predicting adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Citations

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  • Risk factors combine in a complex manner in assessment for macrosomia
    Yi-Wen Wang, Yan Chen, Yong-Jun Zhang
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of the Severity of Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy with Birthweight, Childhood Obesity, and Blood Pressure at Age 7
    Yan Chen, Yiwen Wang, Yanjun Li, Guodong Ding, Yongjun Zhang
    Nutrients.2023; 15(14): 3104.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Role of TRPV4 Channel in Human White Adipocytes Metabolic Activity
Julio C. Sánchez, Aníbal Valencia-Vásquez, Andrés M. García
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):997-1006.   Published online October 14, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1167
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  • 127 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis plays an essential role in adipocyte metabolism and its alteration is associated with obesity and related disorders. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels are an important Ca2+ pathway in adipocytes and their activity is regulated by metabolic mediators such as insulin. In this study, we evaluated the role of TRPV4 channels in metabolic activity and adipokine secretion in human white adipocytes.
Methods
Human white adipocytes were freshly cultured and the effects of the activation and inhibition of TRPV4 channels on lipolysis, glucose uptake, lactate production, and leptin and adiponectin secretion were evaluated.
Results
Under basal and isoproterenol-stimulated conditions, TRPV4 activation by GSK1016709A decreased lipolysis whereas HC067047, an antagonist, increased lipolysis. The activation of TRPV4 resulted in increased glucose uptake and lactate production under both basal conditions and insulin-stimulated conditions; in contrast HC067047 decreased both parameters. Leptin production was increased, and adiponectin production was diminished by TRPV4 activation and its inhibition had the opposite effect.
Conclusion
Our results suggested that TRPV4 channels are metabolic mediators involved in proadipogenic processes and glucose metabolism in adipocyte biology. TRPV4 channels could be a potential pharmacological target to treat metabolic disorders.

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    Vijay Kumar, John H. Stewart
    Obesity Reviews.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Wenzhao Zhu, Dinxi Bai, Wenting Ji, Jing Gao
    Lipids in Health and Disease.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yibing Wang
    ChemMedChem.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Wenyi Wu, Jianan Zheng, Ru Wang, Yibing Wang
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    Xi-Ding Yang, Xing-Cheng Ge, Si-Yi Jiang, Yong-Yu Yang
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    Joseph C. Galley, Shubhnita Singh, Wanessa M.C. Awata, Juliano V. Alves, Thiago Bruder-Nascimento
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Frequency of Exposure to Impaired Fasting Glucose and Risk of Mortality and Cardiovascular Outcomes
Seung-Hwan Lee, Kyungdo Han, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Mee Kyoung Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):1007-1015.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1218
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  • 130 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Metabolic abnormalities, such as impaired fasting glucose (IFG), are dynamic phenomena; however, it is unclear whether the timing of IFG exposure and cumulative exposure to IFG are related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality risk.
Methods
Data were extracted from a nationwide population-based cohort in South Korea for adults (n=2,206,679) who were free of diabetes and had 4 years of consecutive health examination data. Fasting blood glucose levels of 100 to 125 mg/dL were defined as IFG, and the number of IFG diagnoses for each adult in the 4-year period was tabulated as the IFG exposure score (range, 0 to 4). Adults with persistent IFG for the 4-year period received a score of 4.
Results
The median follow-up was 8.2 years. There were 24,820 deaths, 13,502 cases of stroke, and 13,057 cases of myocardial infarction (MI). IFG exposure scores of 1, 2, 3, and 4 were associated with all-cause mortality (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 1.15; aHR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.20; aHR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.25; aHR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.25, respectively) compared with an IFG exposure score of 0. Adjusting for hypertension and dyslipidemia attenuated the slightly increased risk of MI or stroke associated with high IFG exposure scores, but significant associations for allcause mortality remained.
Conclusion
The intensity of IFG exposure was associated with an elevated risk of all-cause mortality, independent of cardiovascular risk factors. The association between IFG exposure and CVD risk was largely mediated by the coexistence of dyslipidemia and hypertension.

Citations

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  • Cumulative exposure to impaired fasting glucose and gastrointestinal cancer risk: A nationwide cohort study
    Byeong Yun Ahn, Bokyung Kim, Sanghyun Park, Sang Gyun Kim, Kyungdo Han, Soo‐Jeong Cho
    Cancer.2024; 130(10): 1807.     CrossRef
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    Yunjung Cho, Bongsung Kim, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Kyungdo Han, Mee Kyoung Kim
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    Jie Liu, Feng Yi, Kai Duan, Haibo Liu
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Kyungdo Han, Bongsung Kim, Seung Hwan Lee, Mee Kyoung Kim
    npj Parkinson's Disease.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ji Young Kang, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee, Mee Kyoung Kim
    Respiratory Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Cuicui Wang, Xu Zhang, Chenwei Li, Na Li, Xueni Jia, Hui Zhao
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    Kyungdo Han, Mee Kyoung Kim
    Journal of Obesity & Metabolic Syndrome.2023; 32(2): 163.     CrossRef
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    Min Cheol Chang, Seung Min Chung, Sang Gyu Kwak
    Reviews on Environmental Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jin Yu, Kyu-Na Lee, Hun-Sung Kim, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Longitudinal Retrospective Observational Study on Obesity Indicators and the Risk of Impaired Fasting Glucose in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women
    Myung Ji Nam, Hyunjin Kim, Yeon Joo Choi, Kyung-Hwan Cho, Seon Mee Kim, Yong-Kyun Roh, Kyungdo Han, Jin-Hyung Jung, Yong-Gyu Park, Joo-Hyun Park, Do-Hoon Kim
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(10): 2795.     CrossRef
  • Current Trends of Big Data Research Using the Korean National Health Information Database
    Mee Kyoung Kim, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(4): 552.     CrossRef
  • Lipid cutoffs for increased cardiovascular disease risk in non-diabetic young people
    Mee Kyoung Kim, Kyungdo Han, Hun-Sung Kim, Kun-Ho Yoon, Seung-Hwan Lee
    European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.2022; 29(14): 1866.     CrossRef
  • Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level, Statin Use and Myocardial Infarction Risk in Young Adults
    Heekyoung Jeong, Kyungdo Han, Soon Jib Yoo, Mee Kyoung Kim
    Journal of Lipid and Atherosclerosis.2022; 11(3): 288.     CrossRef
  • Additive interaction of diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease in cancer patient mortality risk
    Seohyun Kim, Gyuri Kim, Jae Hyeon Kim
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Changes in Insulin Resistance Index and the Risk of Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease without Diabetes: Kangbuk Samsung Health Study
Dae-Jeong Koo, Mi Yeon Lee, Inha Jung, Sun Joon Moon, Hyemi Kwon, Se Eun Park, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):1016-1028.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1110
  • 4,540 View
  • 133 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Fibrosis is the most important prognostic factor for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Insulin resistance plays a key role of fibrosis progression. We evaluated the association between changes in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values and changes in fibrosis status in NAFLD.
Methods
We analyzed the data of 15,728 participants with NAFLD (86% men, mean age 40.5 years) who had no diabetes at baseline and visited our centers for health check-ups both in 2012 and 2016. The participants were classified into four groups according to the degree of change in HOMA-IR values from baseline to the end of follow-up: G1 (<0), G2 (0–0.50), G3 (0.51–1.00), and G4 (>1.00). NAFLD was assessed by ultrasonography, and fibrosis status was evaluated by the NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS) and the aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI).
Results
After the 4-year follow-up, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for progression of fibrosis probability increased with increasing HOMA-IR values (OR, 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.87 to 2.71 for NFS; and OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 2.05 to 3.18 for APRI, G4). This tendency remained consistent throughout the subgroup analyses, except in those for female sex and a body mass index <25 kg/m2. The OR for regression of fibrosis probability decreased with increasing HOMA-IR values (OR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.43 for NFS, G4).
Conclusion
Changes in HOMA-IR values were associated with changes in fibrosis status in patients with NAFLD without diabetes, which underscores the role of insulin resistance in liver fibrosis.

Citations

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  • Insulin Resistance/Sensitivity Measures as Screening Indicators of Metabolic-Associated Fatty Liver Disease and Liver Fibrosis
    Mohammad E. Khamseh, Mojtaba Malek, Soodeh Jahangiri, Sohrab Nobarani, Azita Hekmatdoost, Marieh Salavatizadeh, Samira Soltanieh, Haleh Chehrehgosha, Hoda Taheri, Zeinab Montazeri, Fereshteh Attaran, Faramarz Ismail-Beigi, Fariba Alaei-Shahmiri
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences.2024; 69(4): 1430.     CrossRef
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    Gyuri Kim, Tae Yang Yu, Jae Hwan Jee, Ji Cheol Bae, Mira Kang, Jae Hyeon Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism.2024; 50(3): 101534.     CrossRef
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    Inha Jung, Dae-Jeong Koo, Won-Young Lee
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2024; 48(3): 327.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Liver Fibrosis in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
    Yu Luo, Cuiyu Wang, Tian Zhang, Xiaoyu He, Jianan Hao, Andong Shen, Hang Zhao, Shuchun Chen, Luping Ren
    International Journal of General Medicine.2023; Volume 16: 293.     CrossRef
  • Impact of COVID-19 Lockdown on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance in Adults: A before and after Pandemic Lockdown Longitudinal Study
    Ángel Arturo López-González, Bárbara Altisench Jané, Luis Masmiquel Comas, Sebastiana Arroyo Bote, Hilda María González San Miguel, José Ignacio Ramírez Manent
    Nutrients.2022; 14(14): 2795.     CrossRef
  • Metabolic Score for Insulin Resistance Is Inversely Related to Incident Advanced Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
    Jun-Hyuk Lee, Yu-Jin Kwon, Kyongmin Park, Hye Sun Lee, Hoon-Ki Park, Jee Hye Han, Sang Bong Ahn
    Nutrients.2022; 14(15): 3039.     CrossRef
  • Machine learning models including insulin resistance indexes for predicting liver stiffness in United States population: Data from NHANES
    Kexing Han, Kexuan Tan, Jiapei Shen, Yuting Gu, Zilong Wang, Jiayu He, Luyang Kang, Weijie Sun, Long Gao, Yufeng Gao
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Dae-Jeong Koo, Won-Young Lee
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Cardiovascular Outcomes of Obesity According to Menopausal Status: A Nationwide Population-Based Study
Bo Kyung Koo, Sang-Hyun Park, Kyungdo Han, Min Kyong Moon
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):1029-1041.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1197
  • 4,068 View
  • 121 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
We estimated the effect of obesity on the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in women according to menopausal status.
Methods
Women aged 40 to 69 years under routine health check-ups provided by the National Health Insurance Service in 2009 were followed up till 2018 (n=2,208,559).
Results
In premenopausal women, a significant increment of mortality rate was found in underweight and obesity class II (hazard ratio [HR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31 to 1.67; and HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.39) compared to normal body mass index (BMI); overweight and obesity class I did not affect mortality rate. In postmenopausal women, obesity as well as overweight status reduced the risk of mortality compared to normal BMI (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.88; and HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.86). By contrast, there was a linear association between CVD and BMI above the normal range irrespective of menopausal status, which was attenuated in diabetic women.
Conclusion
The current study replicated the J-shaped relationship between BMI and mortality, being more prominent in the postmenopausal group. The risk of CVD was linearly increased as BMI was increased above the normal range irrespective of menopausal status.

Citations

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    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2023; 47(1): 45.     CrossRef
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    Do Kyeong Song, Young Sun Hong, Yeon-Ah Sung, Hyejin Lee, Aysha Almas
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    Yun Kyu Lee, Bo Kyung Koo, Sae Kyung Joo, Dong Hyeon Lee, Heejoon Jang, Jee Won Chai, Myoung Seok Lee, Si Won Jang, Young Ho So, Jeong Hwan Park, Mee Soo Chang, Won Kim
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Prognostic Value of Triglyceride and Glucose Index for Incident Type 2 Diabetes beyond Metabolic Health and Obesity
Hwi Seung Kim, Jiwoo Lee, Yun Kyung Cho, Eun Hee Kim, Min Jung Lee, Hong-Kyu Kim, Joong-Yeol Park, Woo Je Lee, Chang Hee Jung
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):1042-1054.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1184
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Metabolically healthy obese (MHO) phenotype is metabolically heterogeneous in terms of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Previously, the triglyceride and glucose (TyG) index has been considered for identifying metabolic health and future risk of T2D. This study aimed to evaluate the risk of incident T2D according to obesity status and metabolic health, categorized by four different criteria and the TyG index.
Methods
The study included 39,418 Koreans without T2D at baseline. The risk of T2D was evaluated based on four different definitions of metabolic health and obesity status and according to the baseline TyG index within each metabolic health and obesity group.
Results
During the median follow-up at 38.1 months, 726 individuals developed T2D. Compared with the metabolically healthy non-obese (MHNO) group with low TyG index, the MHO group with high TyG index showed increased risk of T2D in all four definitions of metabolic health with multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios of 2.57 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.76 to 3.75), 3.72 (95% CI, 2.15 to 6.43), 4.13 (95% CI, 2.67 to 6.38), and 3.05 (95% CI, 2.24 to 4.15), when defined by Adult Treatment Panel III, Wildman, Karelis, and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) criteria, respectively.
Conclusion
MHO subjects with high TyG index were at an increased risk of developing T2D compared with MHNO subjects, regardless of the definition of metabolic health. TyG index may serve as an additional factor for predicting the individual risk of incident T2D in MHO subjects.
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Musclin Is Related to Insulin Resistance and Body Composition, but Not to Body Mass Index or Cardiorespiratory Capacity in Adults
Yeliana L. Sánchez, Manuela Yepes-Calderón, Luis Valbuena, Andrés F. Milán, María C. Trillos-Almanza, Sergio Granados, Miguel Peña, Mauricio Estrada-Castrillón, Juan C. Aristizábal, Raúl Narvez-Sanchez, Jaime Gallo-Villegas, Juan C. Calderón
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):1055-1068.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1104
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  • 141 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
We studied whether musclin function in humans is related to glycemic control, body composition, and cardiorespiratory capacity.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was performed in sedentary adults with or without metabolic syndrome (MS). Serum musclin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Insulin resistance (IR) was evaluated by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR). Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and muscle composition by measuring carnosine in the thigh, a surrogate of fiber types, through proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cardiorespiratory capacity was assessed through direct ergospirometry.
Results
The control (n=29) and MS (n=61) groups were comparable in age (51.5±6.5 years old vs. 50.7±6.1 years old), sex (72.4% vs. 70.5% women), total lean mass (58.5%±7.4% vs. 57.3%±6.8%), and peak oxygen consumption (VOpeak) (31.0±5.8 mL O2./kg.min vs. 29.2±6.3 mL O2/kg.min). Individuals with MS had higher body mass index (BMI) (30.6±4.0 kg/m2 vs. 27.4± 3.6 kg/m2), HOMA-IR (3.5 [95% confidence interval, CI, 2.9 to 4.6] vs. 1.7 [95% CI, 1.1 to 2.0]), and musclin (206.7 pg/mL [95% CI, 122.7 to 387.8] vs. 111.1 pg/mL [95% CI, 63.2 to 218.5]) values than controls (P˂0.05). Musclin showed a significant relationship with HOMA-IR (β=0.23; 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.33; P˂0.01), but not with VOpeak, in multiple linear regression models adjusted for age, sex, fat mass, lean mass, and physical activity. Musclin was significantly associated with insulin, glycemia, visceral fat, and regional muscle mass, but not with BMI, VCO2peak, maximum heart rate, maximum time of work, or carnosine.
Conclusion
In humans, musclin positively correlates with insulinemia, IR, and a body composition profile with high visceral adiposity and lean mass, but low body fat percentage. Musclin is not related to BMI or cardiorespiratory capacity.

Citations

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  • Musclin Mitigates the Attachment of HUVECs to THP-1 Monocytes in Hyperlipidemic Conditions through PPARα/HO-1-Mediated Attenuation of Inflammation
    Wonjun Cho, Heeseung Oh, Sung Woo Choi, A. M. Abd El-Aty, Fatma Yeşilyurt, Ji Hoon Jeong, Tae Woo Jung
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    Kaiyi Zhang, Ning Xie, Huaqiong Ye, Jiakun Miao, Boce Xia, Yu Yang, Huanqi Peng, Shuang Xu, Tianwen Wu, Cong Tao, Jinxue Ruan, Yanfang Wang, Shulin Yang
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    Zhi-Tian Chen, Zhi-Xuan Weng, Jiandie D Lin, Zhuo-Xian Meng
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    Ji Sun Nam, Eun-Suk Cho, Yu Rim Kwon, Jong Suk Park, YuSik Kim
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jaime A. Gallo-Villegas, Juan C. Calderón
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  • Serum Levels of Myonectin Are Lower in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome and Are Negatively Correlated with Android Fat Mass
    Jorge L. Petro, María Carolina Fragozo-Ramos, Andrés F. Milán, Juan C. Aristizabal, Jaime A. Gallo-Villegas, Juan C. Calderón
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(8): 6874.     CrossRef
  • The correlation of serum musclin with diabetic nephropathy
    Jie Zhang, Jing Shi, Zengguang Cheng, Wenchao Hu
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  • Efficacy of high-intensity interval- or continuous aerobic-training on insulin resistance and muscle function in adults with metabolic syndrome: a clinical trial
    Jaime Gallo-Villegas, Leonardo A. Castro-Valencia, Laura Pérez, Daniel Restrepo, Oscar Guerrero, Sergio Cardona, Yeliana L. Sánchez, Manuela Yepes-Calderón, Luis H. Valbuena, Miguel Peña, Andrés F. Milán, Maria C. Trillos-Almanza, Sergio Granados, Juan C.
    European Journal of Applied Physiology.2022; 122(2): 331.     CrossRef
  • Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (RONS) and Cytokines—Myokines Involved in Glucose Uptake and Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle
    Paola Llanos, Jesus Palomero
    Cells.2022; 11(24): 4008.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Risk of Diabetes in Subjects with Positive Fecal Immunochemical Test: A Nationwide Population-Based Study
Kwang Woo Kim, Hyun Jung Lee, Kyungdo Han, Jung Min Moon, Seung Wook Hong, Eun Ae Kang, Jooyoung Lee, Hosim Soh, Seong-Joon Koh, Jong Pil Im, Joo Sung Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):1069-1077.   Published online October 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1119
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  • 99 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Positive fecal immunochemical test (FIT) results have been recently suggested as a risk factor for systemic inflammation. Diabetes induces inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract via several ways. We investigated the association between FIT results and the incidence of diabetes.
Methods
A total of 7,946,393 individuals aged ≥50 years from the National Cancer Screening Program database who underwent FIT for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening from 2009 to 2012 were enrolled. The primary outcome was newly diagnosed diabetes based on the International Classification of Disease 10th revision codes and administration of anti-diabetic medication during the follow-up period.
Results
During a mean follow-up of 6.5 years, the incidence rates of diabetes were 11.97, 13.60, 14.53, and 16.82 per 1,000 personyears in the FIT negative, one-positive, two-positive, and three-positive groups, respectively. The hazard ratios (HRs) for the incidence of diabetes were 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 1.16; HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.27; and HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.55) in the one-positive, two-positive, and three-positive FIT groups compared with the FIT negative group, respectively. The effect was consistent in individuals with normal fasting blood glucose (adjusted HR 1.55 vs. 1.14, P for interaction <0.001).
Conclusion
Positive FIT results were associated with a significantly higher risk of diabetes, suggesting that the FIT can play a role not only as a CRC screening tool, but also as a surrogate marker of systemic inflammation; thus, increasing the diabetes risk.

Citations

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  • Uncovering a dose-response relationship between positive fecal immunochemical test (FIT) and all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer-related mortality
    Chi Pang Wen, Min Kuang Tsai, June Han Lee, Hung Yi Chiou, Christopher Wen, Ta-Wei David Chu, Chien Hua Chen
    European Journal of Internal Medicine.2024; 120: 69.     CrossRef
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    Willemijn de Klaver, Manon van der Vlugt, Manon C.W. Spaander, Patrick M. Bossuyt, Evelien Dekker
    Gastroenterology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Lasse Kaalby, Ulrik Deding, Issam Al-Najami, Gabriele Berg-Beckhoff, Thomas Bjørsum-Meyer, Tinne Laurberg, Aasma Shaukat, Robert J. C. Steele, Anastasios Koulaouzidis, Morten Rasmussen, Morten Kobaek-Larsen, Gunnar Baatrup
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    Yu Kyung Jun, Seung Woo Lee, Kwang Woo Kim, Jung Min Moon, Seong-Joon Koh, Hyun Jung Lee, Joo Sung Kim, Kyungdo Han, Jong Pil Im
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    Karen N. Barnett, Gavin R. C. Clark, Robert J. C. Steele, Callum G. Fraser
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