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Diabetes, obesity and metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Risk for Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus after COVID-19 among Korean Adults: A Nationwide Matched Cohort Study
Jong Han Choi, Kyoung Min Kim, Keeho Song, Gi Hyeon Seo
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(2):245-252.   Published online April 5, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1662
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  • 4 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can cause various extrapulmonary sequelae, including diabetes. However, it is unclear whether these effects persist 30 days after diagnosis. Hence, we investigated the incidence of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the post-acute phase of COVID-19.
Methods
This cohort study used data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, a representative national healthcare database in Korea. We established a cohort of 348,180 individuals diagnosed with COVID-19 without a history of diabetes between January 2020 and September 2021. The control group consisted of sex- and age-matched individuals with neither a history of diabetes nor COVID-19. We assessed the hazard ratios (HR) of newly diagnosed T2DM patients with COVID-19 compared to controls, adjusted for age, sex, and the presence of hypertension and dyslipidemia.
Results
In the post-acute phase, patients with COVID-19 had an increased risk of newly diagnosed T2DM compared to those without COVID-19 (adjusted HR, 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 to 1.33). The adjusted HRs of non-hospitalized, hospitalized, and intensive care unit-admitted patients were 1.14 (95% CI, 1.08 to 1.19), 1.34 (95% CI, 1.30 to 1.38), and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.59 to 1.99), respectively. The risk of T2DM in patients who were not administered glucocorticoids also increased (adjusted HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.25 to 1.32).
Conclusion
COVID-19 may increase the risk of developing T2DM beyond the acute period. The higher the severity of COVID-19 in the acute phase, the higher the risk of newly diagnosed T2DM. Therefore, T2DM should be included as a component of managing long-term COVID-19.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus in COVID-19: A Scoping Review
    Anca Pantea Stoian, Ioana-Cristina Bica, Teodor Salmen, Wael Al Mahmeed, Khalid Al-Rasadi, Kamila Al-Alawi, Maciej Banach, Yajnavalka Banerjee, Antonio Ceriello, Mustafa Cesur, Francesco Cosentino, Alberto Firenze, Massimo Galia, Su-Yen Goh, Andrej Janez,
    Diabetes Therapy.2024; 15(1): 33.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 vaccines and blood glucose control: Friend or foe?
    Walter Vena, Stella Pigni, Nazarena Betella, Annalisa Navarra, Marco Mirani, Gherardo Mazziotti, Andrea G. Lania, Antonio C. Bossi
    Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pituitary Diseases and COVID-19 Outcomes in South Korea: A Nationwide Cohort Study
    Jeonghoon Ha, Kyoung Min Kim, Dong-Jun Lim, Keeho Song, Gi Hyeon Seo
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(14): 4799.     CrossRef
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Adrenal gland
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Mortality and Severity of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Patients with Long-Term Glucocorticoid Therapy: A Korean Nationwide Cohort Study
Eu Jeong Ku, Keeho Song, Kyoung Min Kim, Gi Hyeon Seo, Soon Jib Yoo
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(2):253-259.   Published online March 21, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1607
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  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
The severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among patients with long-term glucocorticoid treatment (LTGT) has not been established. We aimed to evaluate the association between LTGT and COVID-19 prognosis.
Methods
A Korean nationwide cohort database of COVID-19 patients between January 2019 and September 2021 was used. LTGT was defined as exposure to at least 150 mg of prednisolone (≥5 mg/day and ≥30 days) or equivalent glucocorticoids 180 days before COVID-19 infection. The outcome measurements were mortality, hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, length of stay, and mechanical ventilation.
Results
Among confirmed patients with COVID-19, the LTGT group (n=12,794) was older and had a higher proportion of comorbidities than the control (n=359,013). The LTGT group showed higher in-hospital, 30-day, and 90-day mortality rates than the control (14.0% vs. 2.3%, 5.9% vs. 1.1%, and 9.9% vs. 1.8%, respectively; all P<0.001). Except for the hospitalization rate, the length of stay, ICU admission, and mechanical ventilation proportions were significantly higher in the LTGT group than in the control (all P<0.001). Overall mortality was higher in the LTGT group than in the control group, and the significance remained in the fully adjusted model (odds ratio [OR], 5.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.31 to 6.23) (adjusted OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.67 to 2.00). The LTGT group showed a higher mortality rate than the control within the same comorbidity score category.
Conclusion
Long-term exposure to glucocorticoids increased the mortality and severity of COVID-19. Prevention and early proactive measures are inevitable in the high-risk LTGT group with many comorbidities.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Outpatient glucocorticoid use and COVID-19 outcomes: a population-based study
    Almudena Rodríguez-Fernández, Irene Visos-Varela, Maruxa Zapata-Cachafeiro, Samuel Pintos-Rodríguez, Rosa M. García-Álvarez, Teresa M. Herdeiro, María Piñeiro-Lamas, Adolfo Figueiras, Ángel Salgado-Barreira, Rosendo Bugarín-González, Eduardo Carracedo-Mar
    Inflammopharmacology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Glucocorticoids as a Double-Edged Sword in the Treatment of COVID-19: Mortality and Severity of COVID-19 in Patients Receiving Long-Term Glucocorticoid Therapy
    Eun-Hee Cho
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(2): 223.     CrossRef
  • Pituitary Diseases and COVID-19 Outcomes in South Korea: A Nationwide Cohort Study
    Jeonghoon Ha, Kyoung Min Kim, Dong-Jun Lim, Keeho Song, Gi Hyeon Seo
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(14): 4799.     CrossRef
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Calcium & Bone Metabolism
Comparison of Two DXA Systems, Hologic Horizon W and GE Lunar Prodigy, for Assessing Body Composition in Healthy Korean Adults
Seung Shin Park, Soo Lim, Hoyoun Kim, Kyoung Min Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(6):1219-1231.   Published online December 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1274
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  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the most widely used method for evaluating muscle masses. The aim of this study was to investigate the agreement between muscle mass values assessed by two different DXA systems.
Methods
Forty healthy participants (20 men, 20 women; age range, 23 to 71 years) were enrolled. Total and regional body compositional values for fat and lean masses were measured consecutively with two DXA machines, Hologic Horizon and GE Lunar Prodigy. Appendicular lean mass (ALM) was calculated as the sum of the lean mass of four limbs.
Results
In both sexes, the ALM values measured by the GE Lunar Prodigy (24.8±4.3 kg in men, 15.8±2.9 kg in women) were significantly higher than those assessed by Hologic Horizon (23.0±4.0 kg in men, 14.8±3.2 kg in women). Furthermore, BMI values or body fat (%), either extremely higher or lower levels, contributed greater differences between two systems. Bland-Altman analyses revealed a significant bias between ALM values assessed by the two systems. Linear regression analyses were performed to develop equations to adjust for systematic differences (men: Horizon ALM [kg]=0.915×Lunar Prodigy ALM [kg]+0.322, R2=0.956; women: Horizon ALM [kg]=1.066×Lunar Prodigy ALM [kg]–2.064, R2=0.952).
Conclusion
Although measurements of body composition including muscle mass by the two DXA systems correlated strongly, significant differences were observed. Calibration equations should enable mutual conversion between different DXA systems.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Total and regional appendicular skeletal muscle mass prediction from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry body composition models
    Cassidy McCarthy, Grant M. Tinsley, Anja Bosy-Westphal, Manfred J. Müller, John Shepherd, Dympna Gallagher, Steven B. Heymsfield
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cross-Calibration of iDXA and pQCT Scanners at Rural and Urban Research Sites in The Gambia, West Africa
    Mícheál Ó Breasail, Ramatoulie Janha, Ayse Zengin, Camille Pearse, Landing Jarjou, Ann Prentice, Kate A. Ward
    Calcified Tissue International.2023; 112(5): 573.     CrossRef
  • Estimation of Absolute and Relative Body Fat Content Using Noninvasive Surrogates: Can DXA Be Bypassed?
    David J. Greenblatt, Christopher D. Bruno, Jerold S. Harmatz, Bess Dawson‐Hughes, Qingchen Zhang, Chunhui Li, Christina R. Chow
    The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Close layer
Clinical Study
Romosozumab in Postmenopausal Korean Women with Osteoporosis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Efficacy and Safety Study
Ki-Hyun Baek, Yoon-Sok Chung, Jung-Min Koh, In Joo Kim, Kyoung Min Kim, Yong-Ki Min, Ki Deok Park, Rajani Dinavahi, Judy Maddox, Wenjing Yang, Sooa Kim, Sang Jin Lee, Hyungjin Cho, Sung-Kil Lim
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(1):60-69.   Published online February 24, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.848
  • 7,211 View
  • 402 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
This phase 3 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of 6-month treatment with romosozumab in Korean postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.
Methods
Sixty-seven postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (bone mineral density [BMD] T-scores ≤–2.5 at the lumbar spine, total hip, or femoral neck) were randomized (1:1) to receive monthly subcutaneous injections of romosozumab (210 mg; n=34) or placebo (n=33) for 6 months.
Results
At month 6, the difference in the least square (LS) mean percent change from baseline in lumbar spine BMD (primary efficacy endpoint) between the romosozumab (9.5%) and placebo (–0.1%) groups was significant (9.6%; 95% confidence interval, 7.6 to 11.5; P<0.001). The difference in the LS mean percent change from baseline was also significant for total hip and femoral neck BMD (secondary efficacy endpoints). After treatment with romosozumab, the percent change from baseline in procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide transiently increased at months 1 and 3, while that in C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen showed a sustained decrease. No events of cancer, hypocalcemia, injection site reaction, positively adjudicated atypical femoral fracture or osteonecrosis of the jaw, or positively adjudicated serious cardiovascular adverse events were observed. At month 9, 17.6% and 2.9% of patients in the romosozumab group developed binding and neutralizing antibodies, respectively.
Conclusion
Treatment with romosozumab for 6 months was well tolerated and significantly increased lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck BMD compared with placebo in Korean postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02791516).

Citations

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  • A pharmacovigilance analysis of FDA adverse event reporting system events for romosozumab
    Zepeng Chen, Ming Li, Shuzhen Li, Yuxi Li, Junyan Wu, Kaifeng Qiu, Xiaoxia Yu, Lin Huang, Guanghui Chen
    Expert Opinion on Drug Safety.2023; 22(4): 339.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of romosozumab (evenity) for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture in postmenopausal women: A systematic review and meta‐analysis of randomized controlled trials (CDM‐J)
    Wenbo Huang, Masashi Nagao, Naohiro Yonemoto, Sen Guo, Takeshi Tanigawa, Yuji Nishizaki
    Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety.2023; 32(6): 671.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and Cardiovascular Safety of Romosozumab: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review
    Seo-Yong Choi, Jeong-Min Kim, Sang-Hyeon Oh, Seunghyun Cheon, Jee-Eun Chung
    Korean Journal of Clinical Pharmacy.2023; 33(2): 128.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Studies On Romosozumab: An Alternative For Individuals With A High Risk Of Osteoporotic Fractures: A Current Concepts Review (Part I)
    E. Carlos Rodriguez-Merchan, Alonso Moreno-Garcia, Hortensia De la Corte-Rodriguez
    SurgiColl.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Romosozumab in osteoporosis: yesterday, today and tomorrow
    Dong Wu, Lei Li, Zhun Wen, Guangbin Wang
    Journal of Translational Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of anti-sclerostin antibodies in the treatment of osteoporosis: A meta-analysis and systematic review
    Frideriki Poutoglidou, Efthimios Samoladas, Nikolaos Raikos, Dimitrios Kouvelas
    Journal of Clinical Densitometry.2022; 25(3): 401.     CrossRef
  • Benefits of lumican on human bone health: clinical evidence using bone marrow aspirates
    Yun Sun Lee, So Jeong Park, Jin Young Lee, Eunah Choi, Beom-Jun Kim
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2022; 37(4): 821.     CrossRef
  • What is the risk of cardiovascular events in osteoporotic patients treated with romosozumab?
    I. R. Reid
    Expert Opinion on Drug Safety.2022; 21(12): 1441.     CrossRef
  • Proxied Therapeutic Inhibition on Wnt Signaling Antagonists and Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases: Multi-Omics Analyses
    Yu Qian, Cheng-Da Yuan, Saber Khederzadeh, Ming-Yu Han, Hai-Xia Liu, Mo-Chang Qiu, Jian-Hua Gao, Wei-Lin Wang, Yun-Piao Hou, Guo-Bo Chen, Ke-Qi Liu, Lin Xu, David Karasik, Shu-Yang Xie, Hou-Feng Zheng
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Multi-Omics Analyses Identify Pleiotropy and Causality Between Circulating Sclerostin and Atrial Fibrillation
    Yu Qian, Peng-Lin Guan, Saber Khederzadeh, Ke-Qi Liu, Cheng-Da Yuan, Ming-Yu Han, Hai-Xia Liu, Mo-Chang Qiu, Jian-Hua Gao, Wei-Lin Wang, Yun-Piao Hou, Guo-Bo Chen, Lin Xu, David Karasik, Shu-Yang Xie, sheng zhifeng, Hou-Feng Zheng
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Endocrine Research
Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analogue and Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Combination on the Atherosclerosis-Related Process in a Type 2 Diabetes Mouse Model
Jin Hee Kim, Gha Young Lee, Hyo Jin Maeng, Hoyoun Kim, Jae Hyun Bae, Kyoung Min Kim, Soo Lim
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(1):157-170.   Published online February 24, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2020.781
  • 7,213 View
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  • 11 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues regulate glucose homeostasis and have anti-inflammatory properties, but cause gastrointestinal side effects. The fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormonal regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism that has poor pharmacokinetic properties, including a short half-life. To overcome these limitations, we investigated the effect of a low-dose combination of a GLP-1 analogue and FGF21 on atherosclerosis-related molecular pathways.
Methods
C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet for 30 weeks followed by an atherogenic diet for 10 weeks and were divided into four groups: control (saline), liraglutide (0.3 mg/kg/day), FGF21 (5 mg/kg/day), and low-dose combination treatment with liraglutide (0.1 mg/kg/day) and FGF21 (2.5 mg/kg/day) (n=6/group) for 6 weeks. The effects of each treatment on various atherogenesisrelated pathways were assessed.
Results
Liraglutide, FGF21, and their low-dose combination significantly reduced atheromatous plaque in aorta, decreased weight, glucose, and leptin levels, and increased adiponectin levels. The combination treatment upregulated the hepatic uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) and Akt1 mRNAs compared with controls. Matric mentalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were downregulated and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) were upregulated in liver of the liraglutide-alone and combination-treatment groups. The combination therapy also significantly decreased the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Caspase-3 was increased, whereas MMP-9, ICAM-1, p-Akt, and p-ERK1/2 were downregulated in the liraglutide-alone and combination-treatment groups.
Conclusion
Administration of a low-dose GLP-1 analogue and FGF21 combination exerts beneficial effects on critical pathways related to atherosclerosis, suggesting the synergism of the two compounds.

Citations

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  • Current status and future perspectives of FGF21 analogues in clinical trials
    Zara Siu Wa Chui, Qing Shen, Aimin Xu
    Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024; 35(5): 371.     CrossRef
  • Design and pharmaceutical evaluation of bifunctional fusion protein of FGF21 and GLP-1 in the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis
    Xianlong Ye, Yingli Chen, Jianying Qi, Shenglong Zhu, Yuanyuan Wu, Jingjing Xiong, Fei Hu, Zhimou Guo, Xinmiao Liang
    European Journal of Pharmacology.2023; 952: 175811.     CrossRef
  • Use of FGF21 analogs for the treatment of metabolic disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Maria Paula Carbonetti, Fernanda Almeida-Oliveira, David Majerowicz
    Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring the potential mechanism of Simiao Yongan decoction in the treatment of diabetic peripheral vascular disease based on network pharmacology and molecular docking technology
    Fang Cao, Yongkang Zhang, Yuan Zong, Xia Feng, Junlin Deng, Yuzhen Wang, Yemin Cao
    Medicine.2023; 102(52): e36762.     CrossRef
  • The Healing Capability of Clove Flower Extract (CFE) in Streptozotocin-Induced (STZ-Induced) Diabetic Rat Wounds Infected with Multidrug Resistant Bacteria
    Rewaa Ali, Tarek Khamis, Gamal Enan, Gamal El-Didamony, Basel Sitohy, Gamal Abdel-Fattah
    Molecules.2022; 27(7): 2270.     CrossRef
  • Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) and Atherosclerosis: Explaining Their Pathophysiology, Association and the Role of Incretin-Based Drugs
    Eleftheria Galatou, Elena Mourelatou, Sophia Hatziantoniou, Ioannis S. Vizirianakis
    Antioxidants.2022; 11(6): 1060.     CrossRef
  • Unlocking the Therapeutic Potential of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analogue and Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Combination for the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes
    Jang Won Son
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2021; 36(1): 57.     CrossRef
  • Effects of fasting on skeletal muscles and body fat of adult and old C57BL/6J mice
    Mindaugas Kvedaras, Petras Minderis, Leonardo Cesanelli, Agne Cekanauskaite, Aivaras Ratkevicius
    Experimental Gerontology.2021; 152: 111474.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 in Diabetic Cardiovascular Complications and Related Epigenetic Mechanisms
    Mengjie Xiao, Yufeng Tang, Shudong Wang, Jie Wang, Jie Wang, Yuanfang Guo, Jingjing Zhang, Junlian Gu
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Liraglutide Decreases Liver Fat Content and Serum Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Levels in Newly Diagnosed Overweight Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
    Xinyue Li, Xiaojuan Wu, Yumei Jia, Jing Fu, Lin Zhang, Tao Jiang, Jia Liu, Guang Wang, Claudia Cardoso
    Journal of Diabetes Research.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Differential importance of endothelial and hematopoietic cell GLP-1Rs for cardiometabolic versus hepatic actions of semaglutide
    Brent A. McLean, Chi Kin Wong, Kiran Deep Kaur, Randy J. Seeley, Daniel J. Drucker
    JCI Insight.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Close layer
Thyroid
Validity and Reliability of the Korean Version of the Hyperthyroidism Symptom Scale
Jie-Eun Lee, Dong Hwa Lee, Tae Jung Oh, Kyoung Min Kim, Sung Hee Choi, Soo Lim, Young Joo Park, Do Joon Park, Hak Chul Jang, Jae Hoon Moon
Endocrinol Metab. 2018;33(1):70-78.   Published online March 21, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2018.33.1.70
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  • 3 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background

Thyrotoxicosis is a common disease resulting from an excess of thyroid hormones, which affects many organ systems. The clinical symptoms and signs are relatively nonspecific and can vary depending on age, sex, comorbidities, and the duration and cause of the disease. Several symptom rating scales have been developed in an attempt to assess these symptoms objectively and have been applied to diagnosis or to evaluation of the response to treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the hyperthyroidism symptom scale (K-HSS).

Methods

Twenty-eight thyrotoxic patients and 10 healthy subjects completed the K-HSS at baseline and after follow-up at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. The correlation between K-HSS scores and thyroid function was analyzed. K-HSS scores were compared between baseline and follow-up in patient and control groups. Cronbach's α coefficient was calculated to demonstrate the internal consistency of K-HSS.

Results

The mean age of the participants was 34.7±9.8 years and 13 (34.2%) were men. K-HSS scores demonstrated a significant positive correlation with serum free thyroxine concentration and decreased significantly with improved thyroid function. K-HSS scores were highest in subclinically thyrotoxic subjects, lower in patients who were euthyroid after treatment, and lowest in the control group at follow-up, but these differences were not significant. Cronbach's α coefficient for the K-HSS was 0.86.

Conclusion

The K-HSS is a reliable and valid instrument for evaluating symptoms of thyrotoxicosis in Korean patients.

Citations

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  • Effect of thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression on quality of life in thyroid lobectomy patients: interim analysis of a multicenter, randomized controlled trial in low- to intermediate-risk thyroid cancer patients (MASTER study)
    Ja Kyung Lee, Eu Jeong Ku, Su-jin Kim, Woochul Kim, Jae Won Cho, Kyong Yeun Jung, Hyeong Won Yu, Yea Eun Kang, Mijin Kim, Hee Kyung Kim, Junsun Ryu, June Young Choi
    Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research.2024; 106(1): 19.     CrossRef
  • Effect of increased levothyroxine dose on depressive mood in older adults undergoing thyroid hormone replacement therapy
    Jae Hoon Moon, Ji Won Han, Tae Jung Oh, Sung Hee Choi, Soo Lim, Ki Woong Kim, Hak Chul Jang
    Clinical Endocrinology.2020; 93(2): 196.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Feasibility of Monitoring Resting Heart Rate Using a Wearable Activity Tracker in Patients With Thyrotoxicosis: Prospective Longitudinal Observational Study
    Jie-Eun Lee, Dong Hwa Lee, Tae Jung Oh, Kyoung Min Kim, Sung Hee Choi, Soo Lim, Young Joo Park, Do Joon Park, Hak Chul Jang, Jae Hoon Moon
    JMIR mHealth and uHealth.2018; 6(7): e159.     CrossRef
Close layer
Endocrine Research
Effects of Lobeglitazone, a New Thiazolidinedione, on Osteoblastogenesis and Bone Mineral Density in Mice
Kyoung Min Kim, Hyun-Jin Jin, Seo Yeon Lee, Hyo Jin Maeng, Gha Young Lee, Tae Jung Oh, Sung Hee Choi, Hak Chul Jang, Soo Lim
Endocrinol Metab. 2017;32(3):389-395.   Published online September 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2017.32.3.389
  • 5,033 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Bone strength is impaired in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus despite an increase in bone mineral density (BMD). Thiazolidinedione (TZD), a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonist, promotes adipogenesis, and suppresses osteoblastogenesis. Therefore, its use is associated with an increased risk of fracture. The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro and in vivo effects of lobeglitazone, a new TZD, on bone.

Methods

MC3T3E1 and C3H10T1/2 cells were cultured in osteogenic medium and exposed to lobeglitazone (0.1 or 1 µM), rosiglitazone (0.4 µM), or pioglitazone (1 µM) for 10 to 14 days. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, Alizarin red staining, and osteoblast marker gene expression were analyzed. For in vivo experiments, 6-month-old C57BL/6 mice were treated with vehicle, one of two doses of lobeglitazone, rosiglitazone, or pioglitazone. BMD was assessed using a PIXImus2 instrument at the baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment.

Results

As expected, in vitro experiments showed that ALP activity was suppressed and the mRNA expression of osteoblast marker genes RUNX2 (runt-related transcription factor 2) and osteocalcin was significantly attenuated after rosiglitazone treatment. By contrast, lobeglitazone at either dose did not inhibit these variables. Rosiglitazone-treated mice showed significantly accelerated bone loss for the whole bone and femur, but BMD did not differ significantly between the lobeglitazone-treated and vehicle-treated mice.

Conclusion

These findings suggest that lobeglitazone has no detrimental effects on osteoblast biology and might not induce side effects in the skeletal system.

Citations

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  • Efficacy and safety of novel thiazolidinedione lobeglitazone for managing type-2 diabetes a meta-analysis
    Deep Dutta, Saptarshi Bhattacharya, Manoj Kumar, Priyankar K. Datta, Ritin Mohindra, Meha Sharma
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2023; 17(1): 102697.     CrossRef
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    Shashank R. Joshi, Saibal Das, Suja Xaviar, Shambo Samrat Samajdar, Indranil Saha, Sougata Sarkar, Shatavisa Mukherjee, Santanu Kumar Tripathi, Jyotirmoy Pal, Nandini Chatterjee
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2023; 17(1): 102703.     CrossRef
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    Bo-Yeon Kim, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Suk Kyeong Kim, Jung-Hyun Noh, Cheol-Young Park, Hyeong-Kyu Park, Kee-Ho Song, Jong Chul Won, Jae Myung Yu, Mi Young Lee, Jae Hyuk Lee, Soo Lim, Sung Wan Chun, In-Kyung Jeong, Choon Hee Chung, Seung Jin Han, Hee-Seok Kim, Ju-Y
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    Kyung-Soo Kim, Sangmo Hong, Hong-Yup Ahn, Cheol-Young Park
    Diabetes Therapy.2021; 12(1): 171.     CrossRef
  • Lobeglitazone: A Novel Thiazolidinedione for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Jaehyun Bae, Taegyun Park, Hyeyoung Kim, Minyoung Lee, Bong-Soo Cha
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2021; 45(3): 326.     CrossRef
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    Kambiz Hassanzadeh, Arman Rahimmi, Mohammad Raman Moloudi, Rita Maccarone, Massimo Corbo, Esmael Izadpanah, Marco Feligioni
    Brain Research Bulletin.2021; 173: 184.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the Effects of Various Antidiabetic Medication on Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Jeonghoon Ha, Yejee Lim, Mee Kyoung Kim, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Ki-Ho Song, Seung Hyun Ko, Moo Il Kang, Sung Dae Moon, Ki-Hyun Baek
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2021; 36(4): 895.     CrossRef
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    Xue Han, Lijun Liao, Tian Zhu, Yuchan Xu, Fei Bi, Li Xie, Hui Li, Fangjun Huo, Weidong Tian, Weihua Guo
    Materials Science and Engineering: C.2020; 116: 111224.     CrossRef
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    Evangelia Kalaitzoglou, John L. Fowlkes, Iuliana Popescu, Kathryn M. Thrailkill
    Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Karim G. Kheniser, Carmen M. Polanco Santos, Sangeeta R. Kashyap
    Journal of Diabetes and its Complications.2018; 32(7): 713.     CrossRef
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Clinical Study
Characterization of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes according to Body Mass Index: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 to 2011
Dong-Hwa Lee, Kyong Yeun Jung, Kyeong Seon Park, Kyoung Min Kim, Jae Hoon Moon, Soo Lim, Hak Chul Jang, Sung Hee Choi
Endocrinol Metab. 2015;30(4):514-521.   Published online December 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2015.30.4.514
  • 3,724 View
  • 42 Download
  • 15 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

The present study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Korean adults according to body mass index (BMI) and to analyze the association with cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Methods

We conducted a cross-sectional study of data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 to 2011. A total of 3,370 patients with T2DM were divided into categories according to BMI. We conducted a comparison of the T2DM patient population composition by BMI category between different countries. We investigated the prevalence of awareness, treatment, and target control of T2DM according to BMI.

Results

Patients with T2DM had a higher BMI, and were more likely to have a history of CVD than healthy controls. For Korean adults with T2DM, 8% had BMI ≥30 kg/m2. By contrast, the population of patients with T2DM and BMI ≥30 kg/m2 was 72% in patients in the USA and 56% in the UK. The rate of recognition, treatment, and control has worsened in parallel with increasing BMI. Even in patients with BMI 25 to 29.9 kg/m2, the prevalence of CVD or high risk factors for CVD was significantly higher than in patients with BMI 18.5 to 22.9 kg/m2 (odds ratio, 2.07).

Conclusion

Korean patients with T2DM had lower BMI than those in Western countries. Higher BMI was associated with lower awareness, treatment, and control of diabetes, and a positive association was observed between CVD or high risk factors for CVD and BMI, even for patients who were overweight but not obese.

Citations

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    Ildiko Lingvay, Priya Sumithran, Ricardo V Cohen, Carel W le Roux
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    Scientific Reports.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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  • Association between Body Weight Changes and Menstrual Irregularity: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010 to 2012
    Kyung Min Ko, Kyungdo Han, Youn Jee Chung, Kun-Ho Yoon, Yong Gyu Park, Seung-Hwan Lee
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  • Response: Characterization of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes according to Body Mass Index: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 to 2011 (Endocrinol Metab 2015;30:514-21, Dong-Hwa Lee et al.)
    Sung Hee Choi
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2016; 31(2): 347.     CrossRef
  • Letter: Characterization of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes according to Body Mass Index: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 to 2011 (Endocrinol Metab 2015;30:514-21, Dong-Hwa Lee et al.)
    Eun-Hee Cho
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2016; 31(2): 345.     CrossRef
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Review Article
Bone Metabolism
The Risks and Benefits of Calcium Supplementation
Chan Soo Shin, Kyoung Min Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2015;30(1):27-34.   Published online March 27, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2015.30.1.27
  • 5,530 View
  • 62 Download
  • 16 Web of Science
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   

The association between calcium supplementation and adverse cardiovascular events has recently become a topic of debate due to the publication of two epidemiological studies and one meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. The reports indicate that there is a significant increase in adverse cardiovascular events following supplementation with calcium; however, a number of experts have raised several issues with these reports such as inconsistencies in attempts to reproduce the findings in other populations and questions concerning the validity of the data due to low compliance, biases in case ascertainment, and/or a lack of adjustment. Additionally, the Auckland Calcium Study, the Women's Health Initiative, and many other studies included in the meta-analysis obtained data from calcium-replete subjects and it is not clear whether the same risk profile would be observed in populations with low calcium intakes. Dietary calcium intake varies widely throughout the world and it is especially low in East Asia, although the risk of cardiovascular events is less prominent in this region. Therefore, clarification is necessary regarding the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular events following calcium supplementation and whether this relationship can be generalized to populations with low calcium intakes. Additionally, the skeletal benefits from calcium supplementation are greater in subjects with low calcium intakes and, therefore, the risk-benefit ratio of calcium supplementation is likely to differ based on the dietary calcium intake and risks of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases of various populations. Further studies investigating the risk-benefit profiles of calcium supplementation in various populations are required to develop population-specific guidelines for individuals of different genders, ages, ethnicities, and risk profiles around the world.

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    Xu Chu, Xingwu Jiang, Yanyan Liu, Shaojie Zhai, Yaqin Jiang, Yang Chen, Jun Wu, Ya Wang, Yelin Wu, Xiaofeng Tao, Xinhong He, Wenbo Bu
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Close layer
Case Reports
1-34 PTH Could Reverse Impaired Bone Mineralization Induced By the Overdose of Bisphosphonate.
Kyeong Hye Park, Kwang Joon Kim, Han Seok Choi, Kyoung Min Kim, Eun Young Lee, Seonhui Han, Hyun Sil Kim, Daham Kim, Hannah Seok, Eun Yeong Choe, Yumie Rhee, Sung Kil Lim
Endocrinol Metab. 2012;27(3):247-250.   Published online September 19, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2012.27.3.247
  • 12,740 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Bisphosphonates are the mainstay of osteoporosis treatment. Despite the fact that bisphosphonates have a relatively good safety record and are tolerated well by the majority of patients, serious adverse events have been associated with their use. A 41-year-old man had been diagnosed with osteoporosis and had taken etidronate 200 mg/day daily for 2 years due to the judgmental error. He was referred for the management of refractory bone pain and generalized muscle ache. Serum calcium, phosphate, 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D), and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were within normal range. Plain X-ray showed multiple fractures. Whole body bone scan confirmed multiple sites of increased bone uptakes. Tetracycline-labeled bone biopsy showed typical findings of osteomalacia. He was diagnosed with iatrogenic, etidronate-induced osteomalacia. The patient received daily parathyroid hormone (PTH) injection for 18 months. PTH effectively reverses impaired bone mineralization caused by etidronate misuse. Currently, he is doing well without bone pain. Bone mineral density significantly increased, and the increased bone uptake was almost normalized after 18 months. This case seems to suggest that human PTH (1-34) therapy, possibly in association with calcium and vitamin D, is associated with important clinical improvements in patients with impaired bone mineralization due to the side effect of bisphosphonate.
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Primary Bilateral Adrenal Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Presented with Adrenal Insufficiency: A Case Report.
Eun Young Lee, Kyoung Min Kim, Kwang Joon Kim, Songmi Noh, Jin Seok Kim, Woo Ik Yang, Sung Kil Lim
Endocrinol Metab. 2011;26(1):101-105.   Published online March 1, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2011.26.1.101
  • 1,873 View
  • 24 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Primary adrenal lymphoma is a very rare disease and it is known to have a poor prognosis. We report here on a case of primary adrenal insufficiency that was secondary to primary bilateral adrenal lymphoma. A 54-year old man was hospitalized because of easy fatigability, weight loss and consistent malaise for 6 months. The physical examination revealed hyperpigmentation on the anterior chest and hypotension. According these findings and symptoms, we did a rapid ACTH stimulation test with a clinical suspicion of adrenal insufficiency. He showed an inadequate adrenal response and so he was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency. The abdominal CT images showed bilateral huge adrenal masses and increased uptake of the adrenal glands on PET. The pathologic diagnosis by ultrasound-guided gun biopsy of the right adrenal gland was diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The patient was administered combination chemotherapy with the R-CHOP regimen, and after 8-cycles of chemotherapy, he achieved complete remission of tumor according to the image studies and he recovered his adrenal function. Primary adrenal lymphoma, although a rare disease, should be considered in patients with bilateral enlargement of the adrenal glands and when the adrenal glands show increased uptake on a PET scan, and especially there is adrenal insufficiency.

Citations

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  • Systemic vs. intrathecal central nervous system prophylaxis in primary adrenal/renal diffuse large b-cell Lymphoma: A multi-institution retrospective analysis and systematic review
    John Xie, Albert Jang, Motohide Uemura, Shigeaki Nakazawa, Teresa Calimeri, Andres JM Ferreri, Shuang R. Chen, Janet L. Schmid, Theresa C. Brown, Francisco Socola, Hana Safah, Nakhle S. Saba
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A Case of Adrenal Actinomycosis that Mimicked a Huge Adrenal Tumor.
Eui Joo Kim, Hyon Seung Yi, Inku Yo, Sanghui Park, Kyoung Min Kim, Yoon Soo Park, Sihoon Lee, Yeun Sun Kim, Ie Byung Park
Endocrinol Metab. 2010;25(2):147-151.   Published online June 1, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2010.25.2.147
  • 1,956 View
  • 22 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The incidence of adrenal incidentalomas has increased because imaging studies are now being more frequently performed, including abdominal sonography, CT and MRI. Although there is only a consensus on the treatment of adrenal incidentalomas from the National Institute of Health (NIH) conference 2003, it is generally accepted that surgical resection is required if there's any possibility of malignancy or functionality of the adrenal tumor. Abdominopelvic actinomycosis is a rare chronic progressive suppurative disease that is caused by gram-positive bacteria of the genus actinomyces, which is part of the normal flora of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, with low virulence. Herein, we report on a case of adrenal actinomycosis that imitated a huge adrenal tumor in a 39-year-old women, and the adrenal actinomycosis was confirmed histologically only after adrenalectomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Korean case report on actinomycosis that occurred in the adrenal gland.

Citations

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  • Masking and misleading: concomitant actinomycosis and B-cell lymphoma – a case report and review of literature
    Jo Anne Lim, Peng Shyan Wong, Kar Nim Leong, Kar Loon Wong, Ting Soo Chow
    Scottish Medical Journal.2018; 63(4): 125.     CrossRef
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Endocrinol Metab : Endocrinology and Metabolism