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Thyroid
Hashimoto Thyroiditis and Mortality in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The National Epidemiologic Survey of Thyroid Cancer in Korea and Meta-Analysis
Injung Yang, Jae Myung Yu, Hye Soo Chung, Yoon Jung Kim, Yong Kyun Roh, Min Kyu Choi, Sung-ho Park, Young Joo Park, Shinje Moon
Endocrinol Metab. 2024;39(1):140-151.   Published online January 3, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1748
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  • 60 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Many studies have shown that Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) acts as a protective factor in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but little is known about its effects on mortality. Therefore, this study was performed to reveal the prognosis of HT on mortality in patients with DTC.
Methods
This study included two types of research results: retrospective cohort study using the National Epidemiologic Survey of Thyroid cancer (NEST) in Korea and meta-analysis study with the NEST data and eight selected studies.
Results
Of the 4,398 patients with DTC in NEST, 341 patients (7.8%) died during the median follow-up period of 15 years (interquartile range, 12.3 to 15.6). Of these, 91 deaths (2.1%) were related to DTC. HT was associated with a smaller tumor size and less aggressive DTC. In Cox regression analysis after adjusting for age and sex, patients with HT showed a significantly lower risk of all-cause death (hazard ratio [HR], 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52 to 0.96) and DTC-related death (HR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.77). The analysis with inverse probability of treatment weight data adjusted for age, sex, and year of thyroid cancer registration showed similar association. The meta-analysis showed that patients with HT showed a lower risk of all-cause mortality (risk ratio [RR], 0.24; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.47) and thyroid cancer-related mortality (RR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.40) in comparison with patients without HT.
Conclusion
This study showed that DTC co-presenting with HT is associated with a low risk of advanced DTC and presents a low risk for all-cause and DTC-related death.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Germline polymorphisms of the NOD2 pathway may predict the effectiveness of radioiodine in differentiated thyroid cancer treatment
    M. Borowczyk, M. Kaczmarek-Ryś, S. Hryhorowicz, M. Sypniewski, D. Filipowicz, P. Dobosz, M. Oszywa, M. Ruchała, K. Ziemnicka
    Journal of Endocrinological Investigation.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Thyroid
Long-Term Changes in the Mortality Rates of Thyroid Cancer in Korea: Analysis of Korean National Data from 1985 to 2020
Yun Mi Choi, Min-Ju Kim, Jiwoo Lee, Mi Kyung Kwak, Min Ji Jeon, Tae Yong Kim, Eun-Gyoung Hong, Won Bae Kim, Won Gu Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(5):588-595.   Published online September 8, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1723
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  • 2 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Thyroid cancer mortality has been largely overlooked as relatively stable given the large gap between thyroid cancer incidence and mortality. This study evaluated long-term trends in age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) throughout Korea and compared them with mortality data reported by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER).
Methods
Cancer-specific mortality data from 1985 to 2020 were obtained from Statistics Korea. ASMRs from thyroid cancer were calculated based on the Korean mid-year resident registration population of 2005. We assessed SEER*Explorer and downloaded the mortality data.
Results
The ASMR increased from 0.19 to 0.77/100,000 between 1985 and 2002 but decreased continuously to 0.36/100,000 in 2020. The annual percent change (APC) in the ASMR between 1985 and 2003 and between 2003 and 2020 was 6.204 and −4.218, respectively, with similar patterns observed in both men and women. The ASMR of the SEER showed a modest increase from 1988 to 2016 and then stabilized. In subgroup analysis, the ASMR of the old age group (≥55 years) increased significantly from 0.82 in 1985 to 3.92/100,000 in 2002 (APC 6.917) but then decreased again to 1.86/100,000 in 2020 (APC −4.136). ASMRs according to the age group in the SEER showed a relatively stable trend even in the elderly group.
Conclusion
The ASMR of thyroid cancer in Korea had increased from 1985 to 2002 but has since been steadily decreasing. This trend was mainly attributed to elderly people aged 55 or over. The absolute APC value of Korea was much higher than that of the SEER.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • It Is Time to Understand the Additional Benefits of Active Surveillance for Low-Risk Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma
    Kyeong Jin Kim
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2024; 39(1): 95.     CrossRef
  • A Clinical Audit of Thyroid Hormonal Replacement After Total Thyroidectomy
    Islam Mansy, Abdelfatah M Elsenosy, Eslam M Hassan, Mujtaba Zakria
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Diabetes, obesity and metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Risk of Cause-Specific Mortality across Glucose Spectrum in Elderly People: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
Joonyub Lee, Hun-Sung Kim, Kee-Ho Song, Soon Jib Yoo, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee, Committee of Big Data, Korean Endocrine Society
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(5):525-537.   Published online September 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1765
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
This study investigated the risk of cause-specific mortality according to glucose tolerance status in elderly South Koreans.
Methods
A total of 1,292,264 individuals aged ≥65 years who received health examinations in 2009 were identified from the National Health Information Database. Participants were classified as normal glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose, newly-diagnosed diabetes, early diabetes (oral hypoglycemic agents ≤2), or advanced diabetes (oral hypoglycemic agents ≥3 or insulin). The risk of system-specific and disease-specific deaths was estimated using multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis.
Results
During a median follow-up of 8.41 years, 257,356 deaths were recorded. Diabetes was associated with significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.57 to 1.60); death due to circulatory (HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.46 to 1.52), respiratory (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.47 to 1.55), and genitourinary systems (HR, 2.22; 95% CI, 2.10 to 2.35); and neoplasms (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.32). Diabetes was also associated with a significantly higher risk of death due to ischemic heart disease (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.63 to 1.76), cerebrovascular disease (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.41 to 1.50), pneumonia (HR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.63 to 1.76), and acute or chronic kidney disease (HR, 2.23; 95% CI, 2.09 to 2.38). There was a stepwise increase in the risk of death across the glucose spectrum (P for trend <0.0001). Stroke, heart failure, or chronic kidney disease increased the risk of all-cause mortality at every stage of glucose intolerance.
Conclusion
A dose-dependent association between the risk of mortality from various causes and severity of glucose tolerance was noted in the elderly population.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Characteristics and Risk of Mortality in the Elderly Korean Population
    Sunghwan Suh
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(5): 522.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, obesity and metabolism
Triglyceride-Glucose Index Predicts Future Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases: A 16-Year Follow-up in a Prospective, Community-Dwelling Cohort Study
Joon Ho Moon, Yongkang Kim, Tae Jung Oh, Jae Hoon Moon, Soo Heon Kwak, Kyong Soo Park, Hak Chul Jang, Sung Hee Choi, Nam H. Cho
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(4):406-417.   Published online August 3, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2023.1703
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
While the triglyceride-glucose (TyG) index is a measure of insulin resistance, its association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) has not been well elucidated. We evaluated the TyG index for prediction of CVDs in a prospective large communitybased cohort.
Methods
Individuals 40 to 70 years old were prospectively followed for a median 15.6 years. The TyG index was calculated as the Ln [fasting triglycerides (mg/dL)×fasting glucose (mg/dL)/2]. CVDs included any acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease or cerebrovascular disease. We used a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate CVD risks according to quartiles of the TyG index and plotted the receiver operating characteristics curve for the incident CVD.
Results
Among 8,511 subjects (age 51.9±8.8 years; 47.5% males), 931 (10.9%) had incident CVDs during the follow-up. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, total cholesterol, smoking, alcohol, exercise, and C-reactive protein, subjects in the highest TyG quartile had 36% increased risk of incident CVD compared with the lowest TyG quartile (hazard ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.68). Carotid plaque, assessed by ultrasonography was more frequent in subjects in the higher quartile of TyG index (P for trend=0.049 in men and P for trend <0.001 in women). The TyG index had a higher predictive power for CVDs than the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (area under the curve, 0.578 for TyG and 0.543 for HOMA-IR). Adding TyG index on diabetes or hypertension alone gave sounder predictability for CVDs.
Conclusion
The TyG index is independently associated with future CVDs in 16 years of follow-up in large, prospective Korean cohort.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Construction and validation of a nomogram for predicting diabetes remission at 3 months after bariatric surgery in patients with obesity combined with type 2 diabetes mellitus
    Kaisheng Yuan, Bing Wu, Ruiqi Zeng, Fuqing Zhou, Ruixiang Hu, Cunchuan Wang
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2024; 26(1): 169.     CrossRef
  • Association between the triglyceride glucose index and chronic total coronary occlusion: A cross-sectional study from southwest China
    Kaiyong Xiao, Huili Cao, Bin Yang, Zhe Xv, Lian Xiao, Jianping Wang, Shuiqing Ni, Hui Feng, Zhongwei He, Lei Xv, Juan Li, Dongmei Xv
    Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases.2024; 34(4): 850.     CrossRef
  • The association between TyG and all-cause/non-cardiovascular mortality in general patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is modified by age: results from the cohort study of NHANES 1999–2018
    Younan Yao, Bo Wang, Tian Geng, Jiyan Chen, Wan Chen, Liwen Li
    Cardiovascular Diabetology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of triglyceride glucose index and modified triglyceride glucose indices in prediction of cardiovascular diseases in middle aged and older Chinese adults
    Cancan Cui, Yitian Qi, Jiayin Song, Xinyun Shang, Tianjiao Han, Ning Han, Siqi Yue, Yining Zha, Zhonghang Xu, Jiannan Li, Lin Liu
    Cardiovascular Diabetology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Triglyceride-glucose index predicts type 2 diabetes mellitus more effectively than oral glucose tolerance test-derived insulin sensitivity and secretion markers
    Min Jin Lee, Ji Hyun Bae, Ah Reum Khang, Dongwon Yi, Mi Sook Yun, Yang Ho Kang
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2024; 210: 111640.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic value of triglyceride-glucose index for left ventricular remodeling in nondiabetic ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients
    Tolga Han Efe, Engin Algül
    Biomarkers in Medicine.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the novel three lipid indices for predicting five- and ten-year incidence of cardiovascular disease: findings from Kerman coronary artery disease risk factors study (KERCADRS)
    Alireza Jafari, Hamid Najafipour, Mitra Shadkam, Sina Aminizadeh
    Lipids in Health and Disease.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Adrenal gland
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Mortality and Severity of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Patients with Long-Term Glucocorticoid Therapy: A Korean Nationwide Cohort Study
Eu Jeong Ku, Keeho Song, Kyoung Min Kim, Gi Hyeon Seo, Soon Jib Yoo
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(2):253-259.   Published online March 21, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1607
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  • 3 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
The severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among patients with long-term glucocorticoid treatment (LTGT) has not been established. We aimed to evaluate the association between LTGT and COVID-19 prognosis.
Methods
A Korean nationwide cohort database of COVID-19 patients between January 2019 and September 2021 was used. LTGT was defined as exposure to at least 150 mg of prednisolone (≥5 mg/day and ≥30 days) or equivalent glucocorticoids 180 days before COVID-19 infection. The outcome measurements were mortality, hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, length of stay, and mechanical ventilation.
Results
Among confirmed patients with COVID-19, the LTGT group (n=12,794) was older and had a higher proportion of comorbidities than the control (n=359,013). The LTGT group showed higher in-hospital, 30-day, and 90-day mortality rates than the control (14.0% vs. 2.3%, 5.9% vs. 1.1%, and 9.9% vs. 1.8%, respectively; all P<0.001). Except for the hospitalization rate, the length of stay, ICU admission, and mechanical ventilation proportions were significantly higher in the LTGT group than in the control (all P<0.001). Overall mortality was higher in the LTGT group than in the control group, and the significance remained in the fully adjusted model (odds ratio [OR], 5.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.31 to 6.23) (adjusted OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.67 to 2.00). The LTGT group showed a higher mortality rate than the control within the same comorbidity score category.
Conclusion
Long-term exposure to glucocorticoids increased the mortality and severity of COVID-19. Prevention and early proactive measures are inevitable in the high-risk LTGT group with many comorbidities.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Outpatient glucocorticoid use and COVID-19 outcomes: a population-based study
    Almudena Rodríguez-Fernández, Irene Visos-Varela, Maruxa Zapata-Cachafeiro, Samuel Pintos-Rodríguez, Rosa M. García-Álvarez, Teresa M. Herdeiro, María Piñeiro-Lamas, Adolfo Figueiras, Ángel Salgado-Barreira, Rosendo Bugarín-González, Eduardo Carracedo-Mar
    Inflammopharmacology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Glucocorticoids as a Double-Edged Sword in the Treatment of COVID-19: Mortality and Severity of COVID-19 in Patients Receiving Long-Term Glucocorticoid Therapy
    Eun-Hee Cho
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(2): 223.     CrossRef
  • Pituitary Diseases and COVID-19 Outcomes in South Korea: A Nationwide Cohort Study
    Jeonghoon Ha, Kyoung Min Kim, Dong-Jun Lim, Keeho Song, Gi Hyeon Seo
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(14): 4799.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Impact of Post-Transplant Diabetes Mellitus on Survival and Cardiovascular Events in Kidney Transplant Recipients
Ja Young Jeon, Shin Han-Bit, Bum Hee Park, Nami Lee, Hae Jin Kim, Dae Jung Kim, Kwan-Woo Lee, Seung Jin Han
Endocrinol Metab. 2023;38(1):139-145.   Published online February 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1594
  • 1,849 View
  • 128 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a risk factor for poor outcomes after kidney transplantation (KT). However, the outcomes of KT have improved recently. Therefore, we investigated whether PTDM is still a risk factor for mortality, major atherosclerotic cardiovascular events (MACEs), and graft failure in KT recipients.
Methods
We studied a retrospective cohort of KT recipients (between 1994 and 2017) at a single tertiary center, and compared the rates of death, MACEs, overall graft failure, and death-censored graft failure after KT between patients with and without PTDM using Kaplan-Meier analysis and a Cox proportional hazard model.
Results
Of 571 KT recipients, 153 (26.8%) were diagnosed with PTDM. The mean follow-up duration was 9.6 years. In the Kaplan- Meier analysis, the PTDM group did not have a significantly increased risk of death or four-point MACE compared with the non-diabetes mellitus group (log-rank test, P=0.957 and P=0.079, respectively). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models showed that PTDM did not have a negative impact on death or four-point MACE (P=0.137 and P=0.181, respectively). In addition, PTDM was not significantly associated with overall or death-censored graft failure. However, patients with a long duration of PTDM had a higher incidence of four-point MACE.
Conclusion
Patient survival and MACEs were comparable between groups with and without PTDM. However, PTDM patients with long duration diabetes were at higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effect of post-transplant diabetes mellitus on cardiovascular events and mortality: a single‐center retrospective cohort study
    Uğur Ünlütürk, Tolga Yıldırım, Merve Savaş, Seda Hanife Oğuz, Büşra Fırlatan, Deniz Yüce, Nesrin Damla Karakaplan, Cemile Selimova, Rahmi Yılmaz, Yunus Erdem, Miyase Bayraktar
    Endocrine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after kidney transplantation: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Qiufeng Du, Tao Li, Xiaodong Yi, Shuang Song, Jing Kang, Yunlan Jiang
    Acta Diabetologica.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Safety and efficacy of semaglutide in post kidney transplant patients with type 2 diabetes or Post-Transplant diabetes
    Moeber Mohammed Mahzari, Omar Buraykan Alluhayyan, Mahdi Hamad Almutairi, Mohammed Abdullah Bayounis, Yazeed Hasan Alrayani, Amir A. Omair, Awad Saad Alshahrani
    Journal of Clinical & Translational Endocrinology.2024; 36: 100343.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Association between the Diabetes Drug Cost and Cardiovascular Events and Death in Korea: A National Health Insurance Service Database Analysis
Seung Min Chung, Ji-In Lee, Eugene Han, Hyun-Ae Seo, Eonju Jeon, Hye Soon Kim, Ji Sung Yoon
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(5):759-769.   Published online October 5, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1515
  • 3,514 View
  • 199 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
This study aimed to investigate the long-term effects of diabetes drug costs on cardiovascular (CV) events and death.
Methods
This retrospective observational study used data from 2009 to 2018 from the National Health Insurance in Korea. Among the patients with type 2 diabetes, those taking antidiabetic drugs and who did not have CV events until 2009 were included. Patients were divided into quartiles (Q1 [lowest]–4 [highest]) according to the 2009 diabetes drug cost. In addition, the 10-year incidences of CV events (non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for heart failure, and coronary revascularization) and CV death (death due to CV events) were analyzed.
Results
A total of 441,914 participants were enrolled (median age, 60 years; men, 57%). CV events and death occurred in 28.1% and 8.36% of the patients, respectively. The 10-year incidences of CV events and deaths increased from Q1 to 4. After adjusting for sex, age, income, type of diabetes drugs, comorbidities, and smoking and drinking status, the risk of CV events significantly increased according to the sequential order of the cost quartiles. In contrast, the risk of CV death showed a U-shaped pattern, which was the lowest in Q3 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.953; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.913 to 0.995) and the highest in Q4 (HR, 1.266; 95% CI, 1.213 to 1.321).
Conclusion
Diabetes drug expenditure affects 10-year CV events and mortality. Therefore, affording an appropriate diabetes drug cost at a similar risk of CV is an independent protective factor against CV death.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of mental disorders on the risk of heart failure among Korean patients with diabetes: a cohort study
    Tae Kyung Yoo, Kyung-Do Han, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
    Cardiovascular Diabetology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Review Article
Adrenal Gland
Long-Term Outcomes of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia
Anna Nordenström, Svetlana Lajic, Henrik Falhammar
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(4):587-598.   Published online July 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1528
  • 30,955 View
  • 296 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
A plethora of negative long-term outcomes have been associated with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The causes are multiple and involve supra-physiological gluco- and mineralocorticoid replacement, excess adrenal androgens both intrauterine and postnatal, elevated steroid precursor and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels, living with a congenital condition as well as the proximity of the cytochrome P450 family 21 subfamily A member 2 (CYP21A2) gene to other genes. This review aims to discuss the different long-term outcomes of CAH.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Increased Prevalence of Accidents and Injuries in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: A Population-based Cohort Study
    Henrik Falhammar, Angelica Lindén Hirschberg, Agneta Nordenskjöld, Henrik Larsson, Anna Nordenström
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024; 109(3): e1175.     CrossRef
  • International Newborn Screening Practices for the Early Detection of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia
    Tracey A. Conlon, Colin P. Hawkes, Jennifer J. Brady, J. Gerard Loeber, Nuala Murphy
    Hormone Research in Paediatrics.2024; 97(2): 113.     CrossRef
  • Low renin forms of monogenic hypertension: review of the evidence
    Ugochi Chinenye Okorafor, Uchechi Chioma Okorafor
    Journal of Clinical Medicine of Kazakhstan.2024; 21(1): 14.     CrossRef
  • Increased risk of nephrolithiasis: an emerging issue in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency
    Mariangela Chiarito, Crescenza Lattanzio, Vito D’Ascanio, Donatella Capalbo, Paolo Cavarzere, Anna Grandone, Francesca Aiello, Giorgia Pepe, Malgorzata Wasniewska, Thomas Zoller, Mariacarolina Salerno, Maria Felicia Faienza
    Endocrine.2024; 84(2): 727.     CrossRef
  • Memory in female adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency
    Tania M. Espinosa Reyes, Dainy Cordero Martín, Miguel Ángel Álvarez, Henrik Falhammar
    Endocrine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: New biomarkers and adult treatments
    Bleuenn Dreves, Yves Reznik, Antoine Tabarin
    Annales d'Endocrinologie.2023; 84(4): 472.     CrossRef
  • Interpretation of Steroid Biomarkers in 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency and Their Use in Disease Management
    Kyriakie Sarafoglou, Deborah P Merke, Nicole Reisch, Hedi Claahsen-van der Grinten, Henrik Falhammar, Richard J Auchus
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2023; 108(9): 2154.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Newborn Screening on Adult Height in Patients With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH)
    Heike Hoyer-Kuhn, Alexander J Eckert, Gerhard Binder, Walter Bonfig, Angelika Dübbers, Stefan Riedl, Joachim Woelfle, Helmuth G Dörr, Reinhard W Holl
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2023; 108(11): e1199.     CrossRef
  • Specialty grand challenge in adrenal endocrinology
    Henrik Falhammar
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Contexts of care for people with differences of sex development
    Alexandra E. Kulle, Martina Jürgensen, Ulla Döhnert, Lisa Malich, Louise Marshall, Olaf Hiort
    Medizinische Genetik.2023; 35(3): 181.     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular risk in Cuban adolescents and young adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia
    Tania M. Espinosa Reyes, Alba Katherine Pesántez Velepucha, Julio Oscar Cabrera Rego, Wendy Valdés Gómez, Emma Domínguez Alonso, Henrik Falhammar
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Landscape of Adrenal Tumours in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia
    Mara Carsote, Ana-Maria Gheorghe, Claudiu Nistor, Alexandra-Ioana Trandafir, Oana-Claudia Sima, Anca-Pati Cucu, Adrian Ciuche, Eugenia Petrova, Adina Ghemigian
    Biomedicines.2023; 11(11): 3081.     CrossRef
  • Editorial: Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency
    Semra Çaglar Çetinkaya
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Approach of Heterogeneous Spectrum Involving 3beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 2 Deficiency
    Andreea Gabriela Nicola, Mara Carsote, Ana-Maria Gheorghe, Eugenia Petrova, Alexandru Dan Popescu, Adela Nicoleta Staicu, Mihaela Jana Țuculină, Cristian Petcu, Ionela Teodora Dascălu, Tiberiu Tircă
    Diagnostics.2022; 12(9): 2168.     CrossRef
  • Effetti di Crinecerfont sulla secrezione di ACTH nell’iperplasia surrenalica congenita: uno studio di fase 2
    Marianna Rita Stancampiano, Silvia Laura Carla Meroni, Giovanna Weber, Gianni Russo
    L'Endocrinologo.2022; 23(6): 662.     CrossRef
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Original Articles
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Improvement in Age at Mortality and Changes in Causes of Death in the Population with Diabetes: An Analysis of Data from the Korean National Health Insurance and Statistical Information Service, 2006 to 2018
Eugene Han, Sun Ok Song, Hye Soon Kim, Kang Ju Son, Sun Ha Jee, Bong-Soo Cha, Byung-Wan Lee
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(3):466-474.   Published online June 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2022.1440
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  • 4 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Diabetes is a leading cause of death that is responsible for 1.6 million annual deaths worldwide. However, the life expectancy and age at death of people with diabetes have been a matter of debate.
Methods
The National Health Insurance Service claims database, merged with death records from the National Statistical Information Service in Korea from 2006 to 2018, was analyzed.
Results
In total, 1,432,567 deaths were collected. The overall age at death increased by 0.44 and 0.26 year/year in the diabetes and control populations, respectively. The disparity in the mean age at death between the diabetes and control populations narrowed from 5.2 years in 2006 to 3.0 years in 2018 (p<0.001). In a subgroup analysis according to the presence of comorbid diseases, the number and proportion of deaths remained steady in the group with diabetes only, but steadily increased in the groups with diabetes combined with dyslipidemia and/or hypertension. Compared to the control population, the increase in the mean death age was higher in the population with diabetes. This trend was more prominent in the groups with dyslipidemia and/or hypertension than in the diabetes only group. Deaths from vascular disease and diabetes decreased, whereas deaths from cancer and pneumonia increased. The decline in the proportion of deaths from vascular disease was greater in the diabetes groups with hypertension and/or dyslipidemia than in the control population.
Conclusion
The age at death in the population with diabetes increased more steeply and reached a comparable level to those without diabetes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of Cause-of-Death Mortality in Children and Young Adults with Diabetes: A Nationwide 10-Year Follow-Up Cohort Study
    Iee-Ho Choi, Sang-Woo Yeom, Sun-Young Kim, Jihye You, Jong-Seung Kim, Minsun Kim
    Children.2023; 10(2): 358.     CrossRef
  • Age at Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Underwent Kidney Transplantation: An Analysis of Data from the Korean National Health Insurance and Statistical Information Service, 2006 to 2018
    Sun Ok Song, Eugene Han, Kang Ju Son, Bong-Soo Cha, Byung-Wan Lee
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(9): 3160.     CrossRef
  • Risk of Cause-Specific Mortality across Glucose Spectrum in Elderly People: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Joonyub Lee, Hun-Sung Kim, Kee-Ho Song, Soon Jib Yoo, Kyungdo Han, Seung-Hwan Lee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(5): 525.     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Cumulative Exposure to High γ-Glutamyl Transferase Levels and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Han-Sang Baek, Bongseong Kim, Seung-Hwan Lee, Dong-Jun Lim, Hyuk-Sang Kwon, Sang-Ah Chang, Kyungdo Han, Jae-Seung Yun
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(6): 770.     CrossRef
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Association of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Phenotypes with the Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases and Mortality: A Cohort Study in Korea
Ga Eun Nam, Youn Huh, Jin-Hyung Jung, Kyungdo Han, Seon Mee Kim, on Behalf of the Taskforce Team of the Obesity Fact Sheet of the Korean Society for the Study of Obesity
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(2):261-271.   Published online April 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1259
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  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
We investigated whether low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and isolated and non-isolated low HDL-C levels are associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality among Korean adults.
Methods
We included 8,665,841 individuals aged ≥20 years who had undergone a health examination provided by the Korean National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) in 2009 and were followed up until the end of 2018. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for study outcomes were calculated using multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis.
Results
During the 8.2 years of mean follow-up, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and all-cause mortality occurred in 81,431, 110,996, and 244,309 individuals, respectively. After adjusting for confounding variables (model 3), individuals with low HDL-C and lower HDL quartiles were associated with significantly increased risks of all three outcomes, compared to those with normal HDL-C and highest HDL-C quartile (all P<0.001), respectively. HRs for incident MI (1.28; 95% CI, 1.26 to 1.30), stroke (1.13; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.15), and all-cause mortality (1.07; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.08) increased in the non-isolated low HDL-C group compared to the normal HDL-C group. Isolated low HDL-C also showed an increase in the HRs of incident stroke (1.06; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.08) and all-cause mortality (1.30; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.32).
Conclusion
Low HDL-C and non-isolated low HDL-C were associated with increased risk of MI, stroke, and all-cause mortality, and isolated low HDL-C was associated with incident stroke and all-cause mortality risk.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between HDL levels and stroke outcomes in the Arab population
    Aizaz Ali, Omar Obaid, Naveed Akhtar, Rahul Rao, Syed Haroon Tora, Ashfaq Shuaib
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of adiposity and fitness with triglyceride-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio in youth
    Danladi Ibrahim Musa, Abel Lamina Toriola, Nurudeen O Abubakar, Sunday Omachi, Victor B Olowoleni, Kolade B Ayodele
    Annals of Pediatric Cardiology.2023; 16(3): 194.     CrossRef
  • Association between cholesterol levels and dementia risk according to the presence of diabetes and statin use: a nationwide cohort study
    You-Bin Lee, Min Young Kim, Kyungdo Han, Bongsung Kim, Jiyun Park, Gyuri Kim, Kyu Yeon Hur, Jae Hyeon Kim, Sang-Man Jin
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Adrenal Gland
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Epidemiology and Long-Term Adverse Outcomes in Korean Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: A Nationwide Study
Jung Hee Kim, Sunkyu Choi, Young Ah Lee, Juneyoung Lee, Sin Gon Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2022;37(1):138-147.   Published online February 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1328
  • 3,775 View
  • 157 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Previous studies on the epidemiology and complications of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were conducted in Western countries and in children/adolescents. We aimed to explore the epidemiology of CAH, as well as the risk of comorbidities and mortality, in a Korean nationwide case-control study.
Methods
CAH patients (n=2,840) were included between 2002 and 2017 from the National Health Insurance Service database and the Rare Intractable Disease program. CAH patients were compared, at a 1:10 ratio, with age-, sex-, and index year-matched controls (n=28,400).
Results
The point prevalence of CAH patients in Korea was 1 in 18,745 persons in 2017. The annual incidence rate declined between 2003 and 2017 from 3.25 to 0.41 per 100,000 persons. CAH patients were at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (odds ratio [OR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 1.9), stroke (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.0), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 2.6 to 3.1), dyslipidemia (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 2.2 to 2.6), and psychiatric disorders (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3 to 1.6). Fracture risk increased in CAH patients aged over 40 years (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.7). CAH patients were at higher risk of mortality than controls (hazard ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.0).
Conclusion
Our nationwide study showed a recent decline in the incidence of CAH and an elevated risk for cardiovascular, metabolic, skeletal, and psychiatric disorders in CAH patients. Lifelong management for comorbidity risk is a crucial component of treating CAH patients.

Citations

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  • Hyperandrogenism and Cardiometabolic Risk in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women—What Is the Evidence?
    Angelica Lindén Hirschberg
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2024; 109(5): 1202.     CrossRef
  • Case report: Development of central precocious puberty in a girl with late-diagnosed simple virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia complicated with Williams syndrome
    Eun Young Joo, Myung Ji Yoo, Su Jin Kim, Woori Jang, Ji-Eun Lee
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  • Анализ распространенности и заболеваемости надпочечниковой недостаточностью в мире
    М. Ю. Юкина, Н. Ф. Нуралиева, Е. А. Трошина
    Ateroscleroz.2023; 18(4): 426.     CrossRef
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    Sun Wook Cho, Jung Hee Kim, Han Seok Choi, Hwa Young Ahn, Mee Kyoung Kim, Eun Jung Rhee
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023; 38(1): 10.     CrossRef
  • Long-term cardiometabolic morbidity in young adults with classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia
    Beatrice Righi, Salma R. Ali, Jillian Bryce, Jeremy W. Tomlinson, Walter Bonfig, Federico Baronio, Eduardo C. Costa, Guilherme Guaragna-Filho, Guy T’Sjoen, Martine Cools, Renata Markosyan, Tania A. S. S. Bachega, Mirela C. Miranda, Violeta Iotova, Henrik
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    Chang Ho Ahn, Jaeyoon Shim, Han Na Jang, Young Ah Lee, Sang-Won Lee, Man Ho Choi, Jung Hee Kim
    The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.2023; 234: 106374.     CrossRef
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    Riccardo Pofi, Xiaochen Ji, Nils P. Krone, Jeremy W. Tomlinson
    Clinical Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Suranut Charoensri, Richard J Auchus
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Multiplexed Serum Steroid Profiling Reveals Metabolic Signatures of Subtypes in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia
    Jaeyoon Shim, Chang Ho Ahn, Seung Shin Park, Jongsung Noh, Chaelin Lee, Sang Won Lee, Jung Hee Kim, Man Ho Choi
    Journal of the Endocrine Society.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Anna Nordenström, Svetlana Lajic, Henrik Falhammar
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2022; 37(4): 587.     CrossRef
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Brief Report
Thyroid
Outcomes and Predictors of 30-Day Readmissions for Hyperthyroidism: A Nationwide Study
Michael Salim, Zain El-amir, Asim Kichloo, Farah Wani, Ehizogie Edigin, Hafeez Shaka
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(6):1307-1311.   Published online December 1, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1190
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Hyperthyroidism is associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular events and worse hospital outcomes. The Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) 2018 was used to determine the characteristics of 30-day readmission in patients with hyperthyroidism. The 30-day all-cause readmission rate for hyperthyroidism was 10.3%. About 21.7% had hyperthyroidism as the principal diagnosis on readmission. Readmissions were associated with an increased odds of inpatient mortality (odds ratio, 7.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.97 to 12.49), length of stay (5.2 days vs. 4.0 days; 95% CI, 0.7 to 1.8), total hospital charges, and cost of hospitalizations. Independent predictors of 30-day all-cause readmissions included Charlson Comorbidity Index ≥3 (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.76; 95% CI, 1.15 to 2.71), discharge against medical advice (aHR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.50 to 3.53), protein-energy malnutrition (aHR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.15 to 2.07), and atrial fibrillation (aHR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.79). Aggressive but appropriate monitoring is warranted in patients with hyperthyroidism to prevent readmissions.
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Original Articles
Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Big Data Articles (National Health Insurance Service Database)
Cardiovascular Outcomes of Obesity According to Menopausal Status: A Nationwide Population-Based Study
Bo Kyung Koo, Sang-Hyun Park, Kyungdo Han, Min Kyong Moon
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(5):1029-1041.   Published online October 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1197
  • 3,952 View
  • 121 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
We estimated the effect of obesity on the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in women according to menopausal status.
Methods
Women aged 40 to 69 years under routine health check-ups provided by the National Health Insurance Service in 2009 were followed up till 2018 (n=2,208,559).
Results
In premenopausal women, a significant increment of mortality rate was found in underweight and obesity class II (hazard ratio [HR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31 to 1.67; and HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.39) compared to normal body mass index (BMI); overweight and obesity class I did not affect mortality rate. In postmenopausal women, obesity as well as overweight status reduced the risk of mortality compared to normal BMI (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.88; and HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.86). By contrast, there was a linear association between CVD and BMI above the normal range irrespective of menopausal status, which was attenuated in diabetic women.
Conclusion
The current study replicated the J-shaped relationship between BMI and mortality, being more prominent in the postmenopausal group. The risk of CVD was linearly increased as BMI was increased above the normal range irrespective of menopausal status.

Citations

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    Geetha Kandasamy, Thangamani Subramani, Gigi Sam, Mona Almanasef, Tahani Almeleebia, Eman Shorog, Asma M. Alshahrani, Amjad Hmlan, Atheer Y. Al Suhaym, Kousalya Prabahar, Vinoth Prabhu Veeramani, Palanisamy Amirthalingam
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    Min Kyong Moon, Junghyun Noh, Eun-Jung Rhee, Sang Hyun Park, Hyeon Chang Kim, Byung Jin Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Seonghoon Choi, Jin Oh Na, Young Youl Hyun, Bum Joon Kim, Kyung-Do Han, In-Kyung Jeong
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    Yun Kyu Lee, Bo Kyung Koo, Sae Kyung Joo, Dong Hyeon Lee, Heejoon Jang, Jee Won Chai, Myoung Seok Lee, Si Won Jang, Young Ho So, Jeong Hwan Park, Mee Soo Chang, Won Kim
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    Bo Kyung Koo
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Thyroid
Thyroid Hormone Profile and Its Prognostic Impact on the Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Korean Patients
Jiyeon Ahn, Min Kyung Lee, Jae Hyuk Lee, Seo Young Sohn
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(4):769-777.   Published online August 27, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1109
  • 4,720 View
  • 186 Download
  • 19 Web of Science
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   ePub   
Background
Data on the association between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and thyroid have been reported, including overt thyrotoxicosis and suppression of thyroid function. We aimed to evaluate the thyroid hormone profile and its association with the prognosis of COVID-19 in Korean patients.
Methods
The clinical data of 119 patients with COVID-19, admitted in the Myongji Hospital, Goyang, South Korea, were retrospectively evaluated. The thyroid hormone profiles were analyzed and compared based on disease severity (non-severe disease vs. severe to critical disease). Clinical outcomes were analyzed according to the tertiles of thyroid hormones.
Results
Of the 119 patients, 76 (63.9%) were euthyroid, and none presented with overt thyroid dysfunction. Non-thyroidal illness syndrome was the most common manifestation (18.5%), followed by subclinical thyrotoxicosis (14.3%) among patients with thyroid dysfunction. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels were significantly lower in patients with severe to critical disease than in those with non-severe disease (P<0.05). Patients in the lowest T3 tertile (<0.77 ng/mL) had higher rates of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admission, and death than those in the middle and highest (>1.00 ng/mL) T3 tertiles (P<0.05). COVID-19 patients in the lowest T3 tertile were independently associated with mortality (hazard ratio, 5.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.09 to 25.32; P=0.038) compared with those in the highest T3 tertile.
Conclusion
Thyroid dysfunction is common in COVID-19 patients. Changes in serum TSH and T3 levels may be important markers of disease severity in COVID-19. Decreased T3 levels may have a prognostic significance in COVID-19 related outcome.

Citations

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  • The prevalence of thyroid disorders in COVID-19 patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Sadra Ashrafi, Hossein Hatami, Razieh Bidhendi-Yarandi, Mohammad Hossein Panahi
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    Anamarija Zrilic Vrkljan, Ana Majic Tengg, Tanja Palaversa, Srecko Marusic, Lana Ruzic, Ines Bilic-Curcic, Maja Cigrovski Berkovic
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    Ziqi Li, Pengwei Hou, Shuwen Mu, Renzhi Wang, Hui Miao, Ming Feng, He Wang, Wentai Zhang, Yihao Chen, Tianshun Feng, Shousen Wang, Yi Fang
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    Abdallah Al-Salameh, Noémie Scherman, Imane Adda, Juliette André, Yoann Zerbib, Julien Maizel, Jean-Daniel Lalau, Etienne Brochot, Claire Andrejak, Rachel Desailloud
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Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
High Fibrosis-4 Index Is Related with Worse Clinical Outcome in Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 and Diabetes Mellitus: A Multicenter Observational Study
Sung-Woo Kim, Jae-Han Jeon, Jun Sung Moon, Mi Kyung Kim
Endocrinol Metab. 2021;36(4):800-809.   Published online August 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3803/EnM.2021.1040
  • 5,283 View
  • 178 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Based on recent evidence on the importance of the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and fibrosis-4 (FIB-4) index in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mortality, we analyzed whether these factors could additively predict such mortality.
Methods
This multicenter observational study included 1,019 adult inpatients admitted to university hospitals in Daegu. The demographic and laboratory findings, mortality, prevalence of severe disease, and duration of quarantine were compared between patients with and without DM and/or a high FIB-4 index. The mortality risk and corresponding hazard ratio (HR) were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models.
Results
The patients with DM (n=217) exhibited significantly higher FIB-4 index and mortality compared to those without DM. Although DM (HR, 2.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.63 to 4.33) and a high FIB-4 index (HR, 4.20; 95% CI, 2.21 to 7.99) were separately identified as risk factors for COVID-19 mortality, the patients with both DM and high FIB-4 index had a significantly higher mortality (HR, 9.54; 95% CI, 4.11 to 22.15). Higher FIB-4 indices were associated with higher mortality regardless of DM. A high FIB-4 index with DM was more significantly associated with a severe clinical course with mortality (odds ratio, 11.24; 95% CI, 5.90 to 21.41) than a low FIB-4 index without DM, followed by a high FIB-4 index alone and DM alone. The duration of quarantine and hospital stay also tended to be longer in those with both DM and high FIB-4 index.
Conclusion
Both DM and high FIB-4 index are independent and additive risk factors for COVID-19 mortality.

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  • Impact of liver fibrosis on COVID-19 in-hospital mortality in Southern Italy
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Endocrinol Metab : Endocrinology and Metabolism